Mark Zuckerberg Responds to Philando Castile Facebook Video

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Mark Zuckerberg

"While I hope we never have to see another video like Diamond's, it reminds us why coming together to build a more open and connected world is so important — and how far we still have to go," writes Zuckerberg in a Facebook post.

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday posted a message of grief and solidarity after the Falcon Heights shooting in Minnesota, which was captured on video Wednesday night using Facebook Live. 

Zuckerberg posted on Facebook: "My heart goes out to the Castille family and all the other families who have experienced this kind of tragedy. My thoughts are also with all members of the Facebook community who are deeply troubled by these events."

The video, which was posted to Facebook Live on Wednesday, depicted a black woman with a black man whose shirt was soaked in blood, telling the camera "police just shot my boyfriend for no apparent reason." The woman, Diamond Reynolds, was pulled over for a busted taillight, she says in the video, and the man, later identified as Philando Castile, was shot after telling the officer he had a pistol and was licensed. Castile's death comes less than 24 hours after the death of Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man from Baton Rouge, La., who was shot several times by police while being held on the ground outside a convenience store.

The video appeared to have been taken down shortly after posting, but was just inaccessible for some time after it was posted related to a glitch, not its content, Facebook told The Hollywod Reporter in a statement. The video was later noted for its graphic content. 

Calling this week's images and videos from police brutality "graphic and heartbreaking," Zuckerberg added that "they shine a light on the fear that millions of members of our community live with every day. While I hope we never have to see another video like Diamond's, it reminds us why coming together to build a more open and connected world is so important — and how far we still have to go." 

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