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ANY NUMBER

Debut Date:

Sept. 4, 1972
The Rules:
Choosing numbers between 0-9, a contestant tries to guess the cost of one of three prizes. Once he or she correctly guesses all of the numbers in the price of a prize, the contestant wins that prize.
The Prizes:
A car, money in a piggy bank -- ranging between $1.02 to $9.87 -- and a third prize that falls somewhere between those two extremes
Guess What:
Any Number was the first pricing game ever played on "The Price Is Right," and it is the only active game where winning all of the prizes is impossible. This game also is one of the few where it is impossible not to win a prize. "When we first started to play it, we actually used a real piggy bank," "Price" producer Roger Dobkowitz says. "I wish I still had that piggy bank; that would've been a collector's item. Now, we just put a graphic up on the board."

CLIFF HANGERS

Debut Date:

April 12, 1976
The Rules:
Contestants must guess the prices of three small items. Misses send a "mountain climber" up steps, one for each dollar missed. There are 25 steps, so a contestant can only be $25 off the price of all three items to win.
The Prizes:
Money, usually between $2,000-$10,000, and three smaller prizes, worth between $10-$100
Guess What:
"Many of the young adults today were children when this game started, and as children, they were fascinated with the Cliff Hangers (game)," Dobkowitz says. "Now, they're 35 years old, and it's still the same game they remember when they were 5. It brings back fuzzy feelings."

CLOCK GAME

Debut Date:

Sept. 11, 1972
The Rules:
The contestant has 30 seconds to guess the price of two prizes, one at a time. After the contestant makes a guess, the host tells them "higher" or "lower," and the process repeats. If the contestant successfully guesses the price of the first prize within the 30-second time limit, he or she might use the time remaining to bid on the second prize. If a contestant successfully guesses both prices, they receive both and a $1,000 bonus.
The Prizes:
Various amounts under $1,000, with a possible $1,000 bonus
Guess What:
Clock Game almost didn't happen. "In 1972, we were having so many problems with the clock that ('Price' producer) Mark Goodson went over the PA and said, 'If that clock fails one more time, (this) game is out,'" Dobkowitz remembers. "It worked, but if that clock had failed one more time, we wouldn't have had Clock Game."

PLINKO

Debut Date:

Jan. 3, 1983
The Rules:
The contestant has a chance to win up to four Plinko discs by guessing correctly the price of four small items. The host gives the contestant one free Plinko disc. The contestant then takes the discs he or she has won up to the top of a large board and drops the discs down, one at a time, hoping they fall into the slots with the most money.
The Prize:
Up to $50,000
Guess What:
"(Plinko) was devised during the Pachinko craze," Dobkowitz says. "(Pachinko) was like a pinball game that came over from Japan. It was a big craze back in the '70s, and our executive producer based Plinko on that. Plinko has become the show's most popular game."
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