MIPCOM: 'Better Call Saul' Will Force Fans to Re-Watch 'Breaking Bad,' Sony's Steve Mosko Says

Steve Mosko

"I won't spill the beans too much, but it is going to force you to go back and check out things that happened in Breaking Bad to make sure you were clear about what you saw back then"

Better Call Saul, the hotly anticipated spinoff of AMC's Emmy-winning Breaking Bad, will make fans want to revisit the original series, said Steve Mosko, president of Sony Pictures Television.

Mosko, who recently visited the Better Call Saul set, said the new series will involve "a lot of twists and turns" that will push fans back to re-watch Breaking Bad, looking for clues. "I won't spill the beans too much, but it is going to force you to go back and check out things that happened in Breaking Bad to make sure you were clear about what you saw back then," said Mosko, speaking in a keynote Monday to industry attendees at this year's international TV market MIPCOM in Cannes.

Read more 'Better Call Saul': Vince Gilligan Talks Delays, 'Breaking Bad' Cameos, Starting From Scratch

Sony is producing Better Call Saul with AMC and distributing the series worldwide. The prequel focuses on Bob Odenkirk's character, the sleazy criminal attorney Saul Goodman.

In addition to Saul, Mosko used his keynote to hype Sony's new superhero-themed series Powers, which the studio is making with FX and the PlayStation Network, and season two of hit crime drama The Blacklist. The NBC series starring James Spader was one of last year's biggest global hits, virtually selling out for Sony worldwide.

Read more 'Better Call Saul' Timeline to Overlap With 'Breaking Bad' for Meth-Cooking Cameos

Mosko said that despite the international explosion of digital channels, Sony's traditional linear TV business remains strong, noting that 30 original shows from Sony Pictures Television are on air on 14 U.S. networks. He warned, however, that unless the industry grapples with piracy, it could kill the golden age of TV. Growing piracy could mean that shows "would not only be worth less, they could become worthless," he said.

One way to minimize the damage caused by pirated shows is to move closer to global day-and-date releases for TV series. "The sooner you make it available in international territories, the more you will deter the pirates," Mosko said, noting that this may mean the domestic release of series will be held back to allow for foreign subtitling and dubbing to allow for a simultaneous global release.

Twitter: @sroxborough

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