MPAA Extends CEO Chris Dodd's Contract to 2018

AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

The former senator's contract has been extended to 2018.

Chris Dodd's contract as chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America has been extended to 2018, the organization said Friday. 

Dodd, who served as U.S. Senator from Connecticut from 1981 through 2011, joined the MPAA, the lobbying group for the major Hollywood studios, in 2011.

The MPAA's member companies said in a joint statement, “We are pleased to announce that Chris has agreed to extend his contract into 2018. He has been an impactful leader and a vigorous champion for the industry. We are confident he will continue to effectively help steer our interests through a challenging media and policy landscape and represent our member companies around the globe.”

The statement was attributed to the MPAA leadership: Jim Gianopulos, Twentieth Century Fox, chairman and CEO; Brad Grey, Paramount Pictures, chairman and CEO; Alan Horn, Walt Disney Studios, chairman; Michael Lynton, Sony Pictures Entertainment, chairman and CEO; Ron Meyer, NBCUniversal, vice chairman; Jeff Shell, Universal Filmed Entertainment, chairman; and Kevin Tsujihara, Warner Bros. Entertainment, chairman and CEO.

In his own statement, Dodd said, "I am grateful to our member companies for their continued support. This is an exciting time of almost unparalleled creativity and innovation in film and television and I look forward to continuing to promote and protect that creativity, and the jobs of the men and women who go to work in this industry every day."

Since taking over the post, though, Dodd has faced a number of challenges, since the competing corporate agendas of the member companies he represents, aren't always in sync. In the case of last year's Sony hack, for example, the MPAA did not immediately speak out in support of the embattled studio because not all the other studios were eager to rush to a rival's defense.

In recent years, the MPAA, under Dodd's leadership, has focused on four ares: the battle against piracy, rating movies, supporting state tax incentives and limited lobbying.

 

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