New THR: 'Authoritative, accessible, immediate'

Empty

'Good design is not about making things look better, it's about making them work better."

That was the guiding principles for James Reyman, the New York-based designer whose team spent the past eight months reimagining The Hollywood Reporter as a 21st century publication.

His approach to a rethink of the almost 80-year-old paper involved the belief that all great publications are a product of their time.

"Readers don't have as much time as they once did for reading their favorite publications," he said. "They need their information fast, accessible and easy to get through. People today are constantly on the move; multitasking is a natural part of their daily lives."

Together with publisher Eric Mika, editor Elizabeth Guider and art director Deeann J. Hoff, Reyman set about last summer to forge a new path for readers with a strong interest in the business of Hollywood.

One of the first things to get right, he pointed out, was the creation of a new logo: The idea, he said, was to be "authoritative, accessible and immediate." The one eventually adopted by the THR staff, he said, "projects leadership in the industry. It's easy to remember and is identifiable whether on a newspaper cover, television screen, computer monitor or cell phone."

Among the other major elements that Reyman introduced was the choice of a new, versatile, contemporary typeface with classic lines. "We eventually settled with sturdy, eminently readable faces designed by Cyrus Highsmith of the Font Bureau."

Reyman is the principal and creative director of Reyman Studio, a graphic design firm in New York specializing in editorial design for print.

In addition to undertaking the redesign of The Reporter, his studio's recent projects include the redesign of the domestic edition of the Wall Street Journal — Reyman was a member of the three-person design team; the redesign of the Far Eastern Economic Review; and the Home section of the Washington Post. He teaches typography at the Fashion Institute of Technology. (partialdiff)
comments powered by Disqus