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New York Marathon: 'Survivor' Champ Ethan Zohn, 'DWTS' Winner Apolo Anton Ohno Among Runners

New York City Marathon - Zohn, Baldwin, Sutter - H 2011
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Ethan Zohn, left, Andy Baldwin and Ryan Sutter

Christy Turlington Burns and Jennie Finch, former Olympian softball player and "Celebrity Apprentice" contestant, also finished Sunday's 26.2-mile race, while one of the rescued Chilean miners dropped out at the 11-mile mark.

Survivor winner Ethan Zohn and former Dancing With the Stars champ Apolo Anton Ohno were among the famous faces who ran the New York City marathon Sunday.

Zohn completed the 26.2-mile race -- which more than 47,000 people entered, making it the largest N.Y. marathon ever -- only four days after announcing that he had been diagnosed with cancer again.

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The reality star -- who was running to raise money for his charity, Grassroot Soccer, which aims to take on the AIDS epidemic in Africa -- finished the marathon with an unofficial time of 4 hours, 20 minutes and 46 seconds. (That is only slightly behind his time last year of 4:16.) Among those cheering him on was his girlfriend, Jenna Morasca, who won the sixth season of Survivor.

“I just feel absolutely incredible having run 26.2 miles," Zohn said afterward. "I’ve said it before but I stepped on every single cancer cell out there and I punched out every bit of age you could punch out. I am going to beat [cancer], and hopefully I will be here again next year."

Zohn, 37, was in remission from Hodgkin's lymphoma when doctors told him Sept. 14 that the cancer had returned.

"It's localized in my lung area," he said to People. "But it's good that it's not all over my body."

Meanwhile, Ohno finished the race with the best time of all the stars who participated, the New York Times reported. The Olympic champion speedskater -- who won Season 4 of DWTS with professional partner Julianne Hough -- finished with a time of 3:25:14, five minutes ahead of his goal. Ohno was running to raise money for the Special Olympics.

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“This being my first marathon, I didn’t know what to expect,” Ohno said after the race. “My body is simply not designed to work like that. It’s so long. I probably hit the wall many times.” But, he added, "I'd absolutely do it again."

Also taking part in Sunday's race was Olympian softball player and former Celebrity Apprentice competitor Jennie Finch, who was raising money for the New York Road Runners youth programs based on the runners she passed.

Finch, who started last, finished the race with a time of 4:5:26, beating her goal by five minutes and raising about $30,000 ($1 for every runner she passed).

Also among the famous finishers, according to published reports were former The Bachelor star Andy Baldwin (3:17:31); former The Bachelorette competitor Ryan Sutter (3:17:58); model Christy Turlington Burns (who ran for Every Mother Counts) in 4:20:47; Shonda Schilling, wife of former MLB pitcher Curt Schilling (Autism Speaks) in 4:58:50; Extra host Mario Lopez (4:23:30); restaurateur Joe Bastianich (Grana Padano) in 3:47:03; former New York Rangers star Mark Messier ( 4:14:21); and former Manchester United goalkeeper Edwin Vander Sar (4:19:16).

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Meanwhile, rescued Chilean miner Edison Pena, who was one of the group of 33 men who spend 69 days trapped underground before being rescued in October 2010, dropped out at the 11-mile mark, the AP reported.

Pena, who has been hospitalized during the past year for psychological issues and reported drug and alcohol issues, finished the race last year in 5:40. While underground, he ran up to six miles each day to keep in shape.

In July, producer Mike Medavoy snapped up rights to the miners' story, with Oscar-nominated screenwriter Jose Rivera (Motorcycle Diaries) adapting.

The movie will recount the events surrounding the mine's collapse and the subsequent rescue efforts, which culminated in the retrieval of all 33 who had been trapped half a mile beneath the surface. The project is set to go into production next year.