Pret-a-Reporter

Nicole Richie's House of Harlow 1960 Pop-Up Shop Is a Bohemian Daydream

Courtesy of Tiffany Rose/Getty Images for Caruso Affiliated
Nicole Richie at the House of Harlow 1960 Pop-Up Shop

The style icon's first American storefront, which opens at The Grove this Friday, showcases her love for all things '60s, '70s and rock 'n' roll chic.

Nicole Richie's 7-year-old brand, House of Harlow 1960, finally is getting its own brick-and-mortar space to showcase its collection of '60s- and '70s-inspired jewelry, sunglasses, home fragrances and — for the first time ever — a new collection of clothing, stationary and fine jewelry.

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The brand's first pop-up storefront in the U.S. (Richie hosted her very first pop-up in Dubai in February) will run from July 3-16 at The Grove in Los Angeles. Much like the brand itself, the interior of the store was inspired by the bohemian vibe that has been the cornerstone of Richie's vision since launching House of Harlow 1960 in 2008.

"I went back to the roots of what the brand is," Richie tells Pret-a-Reporter of designing the store with her best friend, interior designer Masha Gordon. "This is my first U.S. store, so I was really using it as a canvas for what the brand has been about since day one, and that’s just my love for the ‘60s, the ‘70s, just the overall freedom of that time." Adds Gordon: "I just think House of Harlow is very bohemian, and the whole style is very colorful and happy and cheery, so we wanted to do something a little more rustic and then add some eclectic pieces to the furniture and a little bit of a feminine touch."

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From unfinished wooden shelving to the potted desert succulents that sit atop the marble tabletops, the atmosphere definitely has the same cool, rock 'n' roll feel that has become a Richie signature and helped her secure her place as a true Hollywood style icon. Even the store's playlist (a taste of which is included below) features '70s bands that embody the "wild and free" attitude of the era, including The Rolling Stones, Janis Joplin and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.

The mix of natural textures, from wicker to leather to stone, and more glam pieces, like the wall adorned in gilded, filigreed mirrors, unite to "bring all the elements into the store, so you get a real feel of what the brand is," notes Richie. And the best part? All pieces will be available for purchase.

"Everything in the store is for sale — the rugs, the coffee table, the tables, the chairs, everything," she says of the furniture, most of which was handpicked by herself and Gordon at antique stores throughout L.A.

Though the store is only open for two weeks, the pop-up has a full schedule of events, including by-appointment sessions with Richie's makeup artist, Beau Nelson (July 10, 5-8 p.m.), as well as the man behind her signature pastel locks, hairstylist Daniel Moon (July 12, 1-4 p.m.).

At the moment, Richie has no concrete plans for a permanent store. However, a kids' collection could be in the works. "My kids have actually been asking me to," she says of a possible children's project. "So, it’s probably next for me. It’s kind of up in the air for right now."

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As for the rest of her summer, the 33-year-old plans to "decompress" after spending the bulk of the season prepping the store and filming her show, Candidly Nicole. Even her hair color is getting a break ("I don’t even know what color it is right now. It’s just fading."), so the busy mom can just enjoy spending time in the sun without worrying about upkeep. In fact, the former party girl has been keeping everything "pretty mellow," noting that Father's Day was a low-key affair at the Madden household. "We just hung out," she says of how her kids treated husband Joel for the occasion. "Which is what I like to do on Mother’s Day, too. I’m like, 'I’d like to not go anywhere.' "

 

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