NPR's 'All Things Considered' Host Robert Siegel to Step Down

Courtesy of Stephen Voss/NPR
Robert Siegel

"I've had the greatest job I can think of, working with the finest colleagues anyone could ask for, for as long a stretch as I could imagine," said the longtime host.

Robert Siegel is stepping down as host of NPR's All Things Considered.

Siegel has co-hosted the weekday afternoon news radio program — reporting on the biggest stories of the day alongside Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers and Ari Shapiro — for 30 years, and will step down in January 2018.

"This is a decision long in the making and not an easy one. I've had the greatest job I can think of, working with the finest colleagues anyone could ask for, for as long a stretch as I could imagine," said Siegel in a statement. "But, looking ahead to my seventies (which start all too soon), I feel that it is time for me to begin a new phase of life. Over the next few months, I hope to figure out what that will be."

Siegel has been at NPR for more than 40 years. He first joined in 1976 as a newscaster, moved into an editor role, opened NPR's London bureau and ran the newsroom as chief of NPR News. He took over at All Things Considered in 1987, sharing his sense of humor on the air yet also shedding light on the September 11 attacks in New York City and the 2015 attacks in Paris.

"As anyone who has worked with Robert can attest, he is an extraordinary reporter and an even better broadcaster," said Christopher Turpin, vp news programming and operations, Michael Oreskes, senior vp news and editorial director, and Carline Watson, executive producer of All Things Considered, in a joint statement. "After 30 years in the role, he comes to work every day with ceaseless curiosity, enthusiasm, and a profound passion for the work and the medium. He is the consummate student, a person whose quest for the answers has benefited millions upon millions of listeners over the years. He is, for all of us, a model of how to be fully engaged in the world, our work, and with his colleagues."

"We'll be planning ways to celebrate and thank Robert for all his contributions at ATC in the coming months," the statement continued. "He's giving us plenty of notice, and we're grateful for that. Finding his successor will not be easy. We will conduct a national search — looking inside NPR and across the media landscape — for the next voice of All Things Considered."

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