Percentage of Women Working Behind the Scenes in Film Drops Below 1998 Levels (Study)

10:00 AM PST 01/14/2014 by Rebecca Ford
"The Heat"

The annual "Celluloid Ceiling" report finds that women accounted for 16 percent of directors, writers, executive producers, producers, editors and cinematographers working on the top 250 domestic grossing films of 2013.

While 2013 was a strong year for women in front of the camera -- such as Sandra Bullock's performances in awards contender Gravity and hit comedy The Heat and Jennifer Lawrence's roles in Catching Fire and American Hustle -- the same cannot be said for women working behind the cameras.

The 16th annual Celluloid Ceiling report revealed Tuesday that there has been no increase in the amount of women working in film over the past year, with women accounting for just 16 percent of directors, writers, executive producers, producers, editors and cinematographers working on the top 250 domestic grossing films of 2013. 

PHOTOS: The Scene at THR's 2013 Women in Entertainment Breakfast

The study, released by Dr. Martha Lauzen, executive director of the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University, reveals that the percentage of women working in film is slightly lower than it was in 1998, the first year of the study. It's also down two percent from 2012.

"The film industry is in a state of gender inertia. There is no evidence to suggest that women’s employment has improved in key behind-the-scenes roles over the last 16 years," Lauzen said in a statement.

Women made up only 6 percent of all directors working on the top grossing films of 2013, a decrease of 3 percentage points from 2012. Women comprised 10 percent of writers, 15 percent of executive producers, 25 percent of producers, 17 percent of editors and 3 percent of cinematographers.  

This year's study expanded to include the percentage of women working as composers (2 percent), production designers (23 percent), sound designers (4 percent), special effects supervisors (2 percent), supervising sound editors (9 percent) and visual effects supervisors (5 percent).

comments powered by Disqus