President Obama Endorses Hillary Clinton: "I'm With Her"

"I don't think there's ever been someone so qualified to hold this office," Obama said in a video released Thursday.

President Barack Obama formally endorsed Hillary Clinton's bid for the White House on Thursday, praising his former secretary of state's experience and grit, and urging Democrats to unite behind her in the fight against Republicans in the fall.

"Look, I know how hard this job can be. That's why I know Hillary will be so good at it," Obama said in a web video circulated by the Clinton campaign. "I have seen her judgment. I have seen her toughness."

Obama called for unity among Democrats and vowed to be an active force on the campaign trail.

As it circulated the Obama video, the Clinton campaign announced their first joint appearance on the campaign trail will be Wednesday in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The campaign said Obama and Clinton will discuss building on the progress made during his presidency "and their vision for an America that is stronger together."

Obama's testimonial came as the Democratic establishment piled pressure on Clinton's primary rival, Bernie Sanders, to step aside so Democrats could focus on defeating presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump.

Sanders emerged from a meeting with Obama earlier Thursday and inched closer in that direction. Although he stopped short of endorsing Clinton, the Vermont senator told reporters he planned to press for his agenda at the party's July convention and would work with Clinton to defeat Trump.

"Needless to say, I am going to do everything in my power and I will work as hard as I can to make sure that Donald Trump does not become president of the United States," he said.

Sanders, standing in the White House driveway with his wife, Jane, at his side, said he would compete in the Washington, D.C., primary on Tuesday, the party's final contest, but noted his interest was largely in pushing for statehood.

Sanders' remarks came after a longer-than-expected Oval Office sit-down with Obama, part of Democratic leaders intensifying effort to unite behind Clinton as the nominee of the party.

Clinton declared victory over Sanders on Tuesday, having captured the number of delegates needed to become the first female nominee from a major party.

Though Sanders has shown signs he understands the end of his race is near — he was about to lay off about half his team — he has vowed to keep fighting, stoking concern among party leaders eager for the primary race to conclude. Still looking like a candidate, Sanders planned a rally Thursday evening in Washington, which holds the final primary contest next week.

As he met with leaders on Capital Hill at midafternoon, Sanders ignored a reporter's question about the president's endorsement.

The situation has put Obama, the outgoing leader of his party, in the sensitive position of having to broker detente between Clinton and Sanders without alienating the runner-up's supporters, many of whom are angry over what they see as the Democratic establishment's efforts to strong-arm him out of the race. Clinton is counting on Sanders' supporters backing her to defeat Trump.

Obama has been trying to give Sanders the courtesy of exiting the race on his own terms.

"It was a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to have a contested primary. I thought that Bernie Sanders brought enormous energy and new ideas," Obama said Wednesday during a taped appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, which airs Thursday ''And he pushed the party and challenged them. I thought it made Hillary a better candidate."

Now head-to-head in the presidential race, Clinton and Trump have one thing in common: Both are working to woo Sanders supporters. Trump has said he welcomes Sanders' voters "with open arms" while Clinton has vowed to reach out to voters who backed her opponent in the Democratic primary.

"He has said that he's certainly going to do everything he can to defeat Trump," Clinton said of Sanders in an Associated Press interview. "I'm very much looking forward to working with him to do that."

Trump, despite a string of victories this week that reaffirmed his place as the GOP nominee, was still working to convince wary Republicans that he's presidential material. Looking ahead to an upcoming speech attacking Clinton and her husband, Trump tried to turn the page following a dust-up over his comments about a Hispanic judge's ethnicity.

That controversy and others before it have led prominent Republicans, including House Speaker Paul Ryan, to openly chastise their party's nominee. Yet Trump's dominance in the GOP race is hard to overstate: He now has 1,542 delegates, including 1,447 required by party rules to vote for him at the convention. It takes just 1,237 delegates to win the Republican nomination.

Trump responded to Obama's endorsement on Thursday in a tweet saying, "Obama just endorsed Crooked Hillary. He wants four more years of Obama—but nobody else does!"

Clinton shared Trump's tweet and added in a simple reply: "Delete your account."

June 9, 11:45 a.m. Updated with Clinton tweet.

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