'Prestige' pulls off trick at Friday's boxoffice

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 Magic trumped the battlefield at the national boxoffice Friday as Buena Vista's "The Prestige" took the top spot for the day, while Paramount Pictures' "Flags of Our Fathers" entered the list in the third position.

 "The Prestige," Christopher Nolan's period tale of dueling magicians, starring Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale and playing in 2,281 theaters, conjured up an estimated $5.05 million for the day, according to the boxoffice tracking site boxofficemojo.com

 Clint Eastwood's "Flags of our Fathers," which revisits the battle of Iwo Jima, took in an estimated $3.48 million in the 1,876 theaters in which it debuted.

 Meanwhile, Martin Scorsese's cops-and-mobsters thriller "The Departed," which was No. 2 at last weekend's boxoffice, hung onto the second spot with an estimated $4.25 million.

 This weekend's other new wide release, "Flicka," "20th Century Fox's family film about a girl and her horse, claimed the fifth spot with an estimated $2.55 million.

 Bowing in 859 theaters, Sony Pictures' costume drama "Marie Antoinette," directed by Sofia Coppola, ranked eighth with an estimated haul of $1.88 million. However, its per-theater average of $2,183 rivaled the per-theater average of $2,214 that "The Pretige" notched.

 On a per-theater basis, though, the 3-D rerelease of "Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas" did even better. Playing in 168 theaters, it scored $7,292 per screen, which resulted in a daily total of an estimated $1.23 million, which earned it a ninth place slot for the day.

 Sony's horror pic "The Grudge 2," which dominated last weekend's boxoffice, slipped to fourth place as it took in an estimated $2.7 million for the day.

BACKGROUND
Published Friday

Top directors face off in first fall frame

By Nicole Sperling
Fall is officially here. The weather is crisper, the leaves are turning, and movie theaters are offering more choices for adults. Sporting the names of Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan and Martin Scorsese, the top films at the boxoffice this weekend are sure to be from accomplished directors at the top of their game.

However, industry insiders are all over the map with their prognostications. Eastwood's World War II movie "Flags of Our Fathers" looks like the top dog, though Paramount Pictures is launching the film in only 1,876 theaters, which might hinder its opening gross. And with Nolan's period magician movie "The Prestige" gaining momentum with adult audiences, some believe it could give "Flags" a run for its money. In addition, Scorsese's "The Departed" is entering its third weekend with strong midweek numbers, an indication that it could remain a contender as audiences of all ages are turning out to see Matt Damon and Leonardo DiCaprio do battle with Jack Nicholson.

There also is a family choice this weekend, with 20th Century Fox unveiling "Flicka," the horse movie starring Alison Lohman, Tim McGraw and Maria Bello.

Sony Pictures will bow Sofia Coppola's "Marie Antoinette," her first film since the hit "Lost in Translation," in 859 theaters. Bowing among the testosterone-packed top three pictures, the female choice of "Marie" -- with its period clothing, rock soundtrack and Kirsten Dunst in the title role -- might prove more lucrative than initially anticipated.

Paramount has high hopes for "Flags," a DreamWorks/ Warner Bros. co-production. With Eastwood's pedigree and its dramatization of the stories of the men who were photographed raising the U.S. flag on Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima, the film might not open to huge numbers but is likely to play well throughout the fall. "Flags" interprets how the Pulitzer-winning photo turned those soldiers into instant heroes and how the U.S. government used it to influence public opinion of the war.

Ryan Phillippe, Jesse Bradford, Adam Beach and Barry Pepper star in the R-rated film. Insiders have placed its opening in the $15 million-$18 million range. Eastwood's biggest opener was "Space Cowboys," which bowed to $18 million in 2000.
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