Princeton joins Google's book-scanning project

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PRINCETON, N.J. -- About 1 million books in Princeton University's collection will be made available online through Google Inc.'s book-scanning project, the school announced Monday.

The university library will work with the Google's Book Search Library Project over the next six years to digitize books that are a part of the public domain and no longer under copyright, according to a school news release.

"Generations of Princeton librarians have devoted themselves to building a remarkable collection of books in thousands of subjects and dozens of languages," Princeton librarian Karin Trainer said. "Joining the Google partnership allows us to share our collection with researchers worldwide."

Princeton is the 12th institution to make its books available through Google Book Search, joining schools like Harvard University, University of Texas-Austin and Oxford University. Internet users will be able to use key words to search the full texts of the books, which can then be downloaded.

"We will be working with Google in the next several months to choose the subject areas to be digitized and the timetable for the work," Trainer said, adding that library staff, faculty and students will be able to suggest what should be digitized.

The Google project also includes Stanford University, the University of California, the University of Michigan, the University of Virginia, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the New York Public Library, the University Complutense of Madrid and the National Library of Catalonia.
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