Producer exits MARV for own venture

Kris Thykier leaves with scripts for PeaPie Films banner

LONDON -- Producer Kris Thykier is exiting MARV Films -- his company with filmmaker Matthew Vaughn -- to set up his own production banner.

The split, billed as amicable, also signals the end of a three-year, first-look deal with Sony Pictures Entertainment.

After making three films with Vaughn in the space of four years, Thykier leaves with a handful of scripts for his new banner, PeaPie Films.

Thykier and Vaughn said they will continue to work together on their current slate of movies, three of which are in post, and Thykier said neither has ruled out making movies together in the future.

Thykier and Vaughn have "KickAss," written and directed by Vaughn and starring Nicolas Cage, Mark Strong and Aaron Johnson, about to hit screens.

Also in post is "The Debt," a psychological spy thriller directed by John Madden and starring Helen Mirren, Tom Wilkinson and Sam Worthington, and Daniel Barber's "Harry Brown," starring Michael Caine and Emily Mortimer.

"Matthew is one of the most talented writers and directors in the world today and I look forward to working with him on these and future projects," Thykier said. "I hope that PeaPie will enable me to continue my goal of building a British production entity able to bring quality commercial British films to the international marketplace."

Thykier's scripts includes "Harry Brown" scribe Gary Young's next, "Devotchka," billed as a female-led action thriller set in Moscow and London. "The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby, Parts 1 & 2" written and to be directed by Ned Benson, also is on Thykier's roster.

Mat Kirby's male comedy script "Wingman" is also among the scripts Thykier hopes to produce for the big screen.

He hopes Peapie becomes a stable for commercially ambitious British indie features and will likely strike film-by-film deals for individual projects

Thykier joined MARV Films at the beginning of 2007 having previously been vice chairman of U.K. based PR and marketing house Freud Communications.
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