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In Theaters This Weekend: Reviews of 'Thor: The Dark World,' 'The Armstrong Lie' and More

Thor: The Dark World
Disney/Marvel
"Thor: The Dark World"

What THR's critics say about the movies opening this weekend.

Chris Hemsworth returns to the big screen for Thor: The Dark World as the Nordic demigod Thor.

The sequel to the Marvel Studios film will see Thor up against the vengeful Malekith (Christopher Eccleston), the leader of the militant Dark Elves seeking to bring the Nine Realms back to darkness. Natalie Portman reprises her role as Thor’s earthly love interes,t while Tom Hiddleston comes back as the mischievous Loki. 

Director Alan Taylor's sequel to the 2011 blockbuster welcomes newcomer Zachary Levi.

Read what The Hollywood Reporter's film critics have to say about all the films opening this weekend and find out how they are expected to perform at the box office.

PHOTOS: 'Thor: The Dark World' Premiere Lights Up Hollywood 

Thor: The Dark World

The saga continues in Marvel’s second solo outing for Chris Hemsworth’s brawny superhero and Tom Hiddleston’s wicked Loki, picking up where The Avengers left off. Read Leslie Felperin's review here.

The Armstrong Lie

The latest documentary from Oscar winner Alex Gibney looks at Lance Armstrong's comeback attempt in 2009 and the subsequent discovery of his use of performance-enhancing drugs. Read Boyd van Hoeij's review here.

The Book Thief

Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson and newcomer Sophie Nelisse star in director Brian Percival's adaptation of the Markus Zusak novel. Read Stephen Farber's review here.

The Ghosts in Our Machine

Liz Marshall views animal exploitation through the eyes of photographer Jo-Anne McArthur. Read John DeFore's review here.

VIDEO: 'The Armstrong Lie' Trailer

Finding Mr. Right

Leading lady Tang Wei turns up the charm in this Seattle-set Chinese rom-com from director Xue Xiaolu. Read Elizabeth Kerr's review here.

Go for Sisters

A parole officer hunts for her kidnapped son in John Sayles' latest, starring Edward James Olmos. Read John DeFore's review here.

How I Live Now

Irish actress Saoirse Ronan stars as an angsty American teen who's forced to go into survival mode after world war breaks out during her family vacation to England. Read Todd McCarthy's review here.

Paris Countdown

Two former criminals are hunted down by their betrayed accomplice in Edgar Marie's debut feature. Read Frank Scheck's review here.

STORY: 'Thor: The Dark World' Stars Talk Marvel Secrecy at Premiere 

Reaching for the Moon

The passionate romance between poet Elizabeth Bishop and Brazilian architect Lota de Macedo Soares springs to life. Read Deborah Young's review here.

Ass Backwards

Bride Wars co-writers Casey Wilson and June Diane Raphael reteam to co-star in this lightweight feature. Read Justin Lowe's review here.

The Motel Life

Emile Hirsch, Stephen Dorff, Dakota Fanning and Kris Kristofferson star in Alan and Gabriel Polsky’s directing debut. Read Deborah Young's review here.

At Berkeley

America's top public university falls under the microscope of veteran documaker Frederick Wiseman. Read Deborah Young's review here.

STORY: 'Book Thief' Private Screening Hosted by Bush Family in Texas 

Approved for Adoption

Co-directed by Laurent Boileau and Jung, this French-Belgian co-production uses animation to adapt the latter's graphic-novel memoir of his formative years. Read Neil Young's review here.

Billy & Buddy

Jean Roba's popular comic-book series is adapted to the big screen by Welcome to the Sticks writers Alexandre Charlot and Franck Magnier. Read Jordan Mintzer's review here.

Medora

Andrew Cohn and Davy Rothbart's documentary chronicles the losing season of a small town high school basketball team. Read Frank Scheck's review here.

A Case of You

Justin Long makes his writing debut with the story of a hack who woos a barista by spying via Facebook. Read John DeFore's review here.

Great Expectations

Jeremy Irvine, Holliday Grainger, Helena Bonham Carter and Ralph Fiennes top the ensemble in Mike Newell's screen version of the much-filmed Charles Dickens novel. Read David Rooney's review here.