Roadworthy Batmobile Replica Goes on Sale for $1 Million

2:02 AM PST 02/28/2014 by Patrick Brzeski
AP
The Batmobile Tumbler at the London premiere of "The Dark Night"

A street-legal take on the "Tumbler" from the Christopher Nolan films -– unweaponized, of course -- has been listed on a luxury goods website.

Somewhere, a deep-pocketed fanboy is pondering a very big splurge.

A roadworthy replica of the "Tumbler" Batmobile from Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins, starring Christian Bale, has gone on sale for $1 million.

PHOTOS: Batmobiles, Gremlins and 'Matrix' Villains: Inside Warner Bros.' Chamber of Secrets

In a listing appearing on the James Edition luxury goods website, the seller states: "We have built this insane vehicle to be street legal; however, please understand that this is not a daily driver!"

The concept car's specs include an automatic transmission and an eight-cylinder LS1 engine, with a custom-built frame, chassis and drive line. It has 44-inch "super swamper tires" with custom rims and a black interior boasting five driver-assist cameras, GPS navigation and a stereo with Bluetooth and iPhone integration. The car seats two. 

The only color option, of course, is bat black. Some drivers may be disappointed to find that the car comes unweaponized.

PHOTO: Adam West Reunites With Original Batmobile

The maker and seller of the car isn't identified in the James Edition listing, but the car's location is listed as Indialantic, Florida.

Should James Edition land a buyer, he or she may soon be hearing from Warner Bros. Last year the studio won a lawsuit against Mark Towle, a California resident who operates Gotham Garage, specializing in replicas of automobiles featured in movies and TV shows.

Warner Bros. took Towle to court for violating copyrights on replicas of the Batmobile. In the intense dispute that ensued, the defendant said that affording the studio the ability to stop reproduction and distribution of a famous car would have "a significant impact on automobile makers and manufacturers."

Warner Bros. won, with the U.S. District Court judge ruling that "it is clear that the Batmobile is a copyrighted character." 

comments powered by Disqus