SAG-AFTRA and Studios Reach TV/Theatrical Deal at Sunrise

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The agreement came after a month of bargaining, a strike threat, three 24-hour extensions and six more hours of talks.

Hollywood can breathe a sigh of relief: There won’t be an actors strike. A new deal was reached at sunrise Tuesday. It’s valued at a record $256 million. The union’s 2014 deal was valued at $200 million.

SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers have reached an agreement on successor contracts to the union’s TV/theatrical pacts, The Hollywood Reporter has learned, which had expired Friday but were extended.

The studios’ “last, best and final” offer came at around 4:30 a.m., and agreement was reached at about 5:45 a.m.

“The Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers and the Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) have concluded negotiations and have reached a tentative agreement on terms for a new three-year collective bargaining agreement,” the AMPTP said in a statement.

THR has learned the following terms of the deal:

* Basic Wages. Annual increases of 2.5 percent, 3 percent and 3 percent. These are the same as the nominal increases achieved by the DGA and the WGA, although those unions had to agree to a variety of carve-outs that SAG-AFTRA apparently did not.

* Pension Plan. 0.5 percent wage diversion in the first year to help shore up the plan, with possible diversions in years two and three.

* Streaming Video Residuals. Essentially the same SVOD enhancements as the DGA and WGA. (Probably also true of ad-supported VOD as well.)

* Travel Fees. Improvements achieved.

* Holds and Exclusivity. Improvements achieved.

* Money Breaks. Increased the money breaks at which various contract provisions kick in.

* Stunt Coordinators. Raises achieved.

* Background Actors (Extras). Raises and overtime achieved.

* Rollbacks. No rollbacks.

Approval is expected, after which the deal will go to SAG-AFTRA’s membership for ratification. The deal came after the union threatened to strike, and after two one-day extensions of talks.

Formal negotiation began about a month ago, on May 31, and talks were held at AMPTP headquarters in Sherman Oaks. Prior to that, subcommittees from both sides held several weeks of discussions, focused particularly on three issues that THR had previously identified as key: holds and exclusivity for short season series, funding of the union pension plan and per diem payments and other travel-related matters.

SAG-AFTRA president Gabrielle Carteris chaired the union’s negotiating committee, with national executive director David White serving as SAG-AFTRA’s chief negotiator. AMPTP president Carol Lombardini was lead negotiator for the studios and production companies. The bargaining took place under a press blackout.

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