Sean Parker Denies Facebook Post Was an Attack on Steve Jobs

Sean Parker, left and Steve Jobs
Sean Parker, left and Steve Jobs
 Getty Images

Sean Parker is denying that a post on his Facebook page was intended as an attack on Steve Jobs, who announced his resignation as Apple CEO on Wednesday.

Parker, who founded Napster and served as Facebook's president, is now an investor and board member at Spotify, an online music service that is in the same space as Apple's iTunes.

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On Thursday, he quoted German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer on Facebook: "We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success."

Many bloggers assumed Parker was referring to Jobs. And Parker on Thursday admitted to Gawker that he was in fact referring to Jobs, but not in the negative way that many people were assuming.

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"You are totally misunderstanding the intent behind my post," he said. "It was in reference to Steve Jobs, but it was a gesture of respect for a worthy adversary. Who remains left to challenge us and inspire us when our most powerful enemies move on?"

Parker was recently portrayed in the Facebook movie The Social Network as a partier and playboy who helped push co-founder Eduardo Saverin out of the company. Parker has said the movie is "a complete work of fiction."

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Meanwhile, Jobs told Apple's board and staffers in a letter Wednesday that he planning to stay on as chairman of the board. Jobs has been battling a potentially life-threatening illness on and off for several years, though he made no mention of his health in his resignation letter.

Apple COO Tim Cook will replace him as CEO.

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