Sherwin Bash, Longtime Personal Manager, Dies at 86

Courtesy of Barry Greenberg
Sherwin Bash

He partnered with future film producer Mace Neufeld and managed such acts as The Carpenters, Don Knotts, Neil Diamond and Anita Baker.

Sherwin Bash, a personal manager and former business partner of Mace Neufeld who helped guide the careers of The Carpenters, Don Knotts and dozens of others, died March 23 of congestive heart failure in Scottsdale, Ariz., publicist Barry Greenberg said. He was 86.

Bash, who began his career in music publishing in New York, and then-songwriter Neufeld — who would go on to produce such films as The Omen and The Hunt for Red October — formed the personal management entertainment firm BNB Management in New York in 1950. 

Bash and Neufeld, who early on also worked for Ray Bloch Associates, a company headed by the bandleader for shows hosted by Ed Sullivan and Jackie Gleason, ended their partnership in 1985, Greenberg said.

In its first decade, BNB discovered and signed such clients as Knotts, Louie Nye, Dorothy Loudon, Don Adams, Bill Dana and Pat Harrington Jr. In 1959, when The Steve Allen Show moved to California, Bash followed and opened a West Coast office. 

 

The 1960s saw the addition of clients including Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, Dyan Cannon, James Caan, Katharine Ross, Randy Newman, astronaut Wally Schirra, Buck Henry and Petula Clark. 

BNB signed The Carpenters in the 1970s as well as talent including Jim Croce, Captain & Tennille, Neil Diamond, Crystal Gayle, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis, Bill Withers, Raquel Welch, Neil Sedaka, Cheryl Ladd, Gabe Kaplan and Kansas.

Projects like The Omen, TV's Cagney & Lacey, Tattoo Records and Big Heart Music were products of the company's expansion.

Later, Anita Baker, David Copperfield, Natalie Cole, Jose Feliciano, Tony Orlando, Lou Rawls, The O’Jays and Ronnie Milsap were among those who entered the fold.

Survivors include his wife Roberta (Bloch's daughter), daughters Randy and Kym and sister Barbara.

 

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