Singapore Court Orders Telcos to Reveal Illegal Downloaders' User Details

Lawyers acting for the rights owners to 'Dallas Buyers Club' seeking compensation from people who downloaded the movie without permission.

The High Court in Singapore has ordered three telecom companies to reveal the names and addresses of subscribers who are alleged to have illegally downloaded movies.

The case was brought by the rights owner to the Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto-starrer, Dallas Buyers Club, called Dallas Buyers Club LLC, and refers to around 500 people in Singapore who allegedly downloaded the movie.

The Singapore move comes just days after the producers of Dallas Buyers Club won a landmark anti-piracy test case in Australia’s Federal Court against iiNet, Australia's third-largest Internet service provider. A similar case is being pursued by Dallas Buyers Club LLC in the United States.

M1 has complied with the court order, while StarHub is in the process of doing so, Channel News Asia reported, and SingTel, which owns the ISP Signnet, must do so by the end of the month.

Over the weekend, the Straits Times reported, a local law firm Samuel Seow Law Corporation had sent letters to Internet users in Singapore asking for a written offer of damages and costs within three days of receiving the letter.

M1 said it did not initially provide personal data of its customers when asked, but complied when the High Court issued an order compelling them to do so.

Meanwhile, Signet said it had also been issued with a court order.

"Singnet must provide the information to Dallas Buyers Club LLC by the end of April 2015," the telecoms group told news channel, ChannelNews Asia.

Singtel said it has until the end of the month to provide information on about 150 of its customers, following the court order.

comments powered by Disqus