Stanley Brooks, guild talks break down

Producer is expected to place his main company, Once Upon a Time Films, and a subsidiary, Sordid Lives Llc., into bankruptcy as soon as Tuesday.

Negotiations between representatives for Stanley Brooks and the DGA, WGA and AFTRA broke down Monday after a conference call to discuss the producer's settlement offer for residuals on the 2008 Logo TV show "Sordid Lives" did not lead to any agreement.

Brooks is now expected to place his main company, Once Upon a Time Films, and a subsidiary, Sordid Lives Llc., into bankruptcy as soon as Tuesday.

In a statement, AFTRA said that despite good faith efforts to "carefully review and understand the merits and practical implications of the settlement offer," Brooks and his "attorneys have refused to meaningfully address our basic concerns -- including clarification of what exactly the proposed settlement sum consists of and how future residual payments to performers were to be guaranteed and paid -- and have withdrawn their offer to settle. "

AFTRA said it will "move forward with confirmation of the stipulated award, which is scheduled for Oct. 22 in California State Superior Court."That would now seem to depend on how soon Brooks files for bankruptcy.

There were negotiations throughout the weekend. Brooks was represented on the call to the guilds by his attorney, Kenneth Suddleson, and another attorney, a bankruptcy specialist.

The guilds wanted detailed information on the $500,000 that Brooks was offering as a way to settle some $1.5 million in debts and penalties, including where the money was coming from and how it would be distributed among the claimants.

The guilds also wanted the money considered a payment for current debts but not for any future revenue. Brooks' reps wanted the money to be a buyout of all claims now and in the future.

This did not sit well with the guilds since Brooks' company has already received at least $89,000 from Logo for residuals, which it has not distributed, and stands to collect thousands more in domestic and foreign residuals from TV, DVD and other sales.

In the guilds' view, that reduces what Brooks is actually paying, which is why they wanted to know the source of the money.

While a number of AFTRA actors are involved, the DGA and WGA actions are on behalf of writer-director Del Shores.

An attorney for Brooks did not immediately respond for comment, and reps for the DGA and WGA did not comment on Monday's developments.

comments powered by Disqus