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Steven Spielberg Remembers Sidney Lumet

sidney lumet
Raphael Gaillarde/Getty Images

Lumet "was one of the greatest directors in the long history of film," he tells THR in a statement.

Legendary director Sidney Lumet was remembered by Steven Spielberg -- and a number of other actors and those in the film industry -- after his death from lymphoma Saturday at 86.

 "Sidney Lumet was one of the greatest directors in the long history of film." Spielberg told The Hollywood Reporter in a statement of the Dog Day Afternoon director. "Compelling stories  and unforgettable performances were his strong suit. "

 

Al Pacino, who appeared in Lumet's Serpico (1973) and Dog Day Afternoon (1975), also paid tribute to the late director. In a statement, he told THR: "Sydney Lumet will be remembered for his films.  He leaves a great legacy but more than that, to the people close to him, he will remain the most civilized of humans and the kindest man I have ever known.  This is a great loss."

"From his first feature in 1957, Twelve Angry Men, to his last feature fifty years later, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead, Sidney Lumet experienced filmmaking with a never-wavering enthusiasm for the form, the technology and perhaps most of all, a true respect for the actor," DGA president Taylor Hackford said in a statement.

Many other stars took to Twitter to remember the director's 50-year-long career.

"Sidney Lumet: In Memory. My obituary and tribute," posted Roger Ebert.

“RIP Sidney Lumet. I played Juror 6 in 12 Angry Men on stage in Chicago for a year. We studied his film. He was a great director," wrote Jon Favreau.

“RIP Sidney Lumet. If “The Verdict” is on TV, I cancel all other plans," added Seth Meyers.

“RIP sydney lumet, he was a true master! if you haven’t read his book, MAKING MOVIES, it is a MUST for anyone interested in filmmaking," said Zooey Deschanel.

“RIP Sidney Lumet. One of our Great American Filmmakers. Had the pleasure of meeting a few times. His brilliant films will live on forever!" Tweeted Ralph Macchio.