Pret-a-Reporter

Style Notes: Idris Elba Is First Lone Male on a 'Maxim' Cover; 'Tiger Beat' Nabs Big Name Investors

Courtesy of Maxim
Idris Elba covers 'Maxim' September issue.

Tuesday fashion news (tequila not included).

Maxim editor in chief Kate Lanphear is a busy lady. Since taking over the men's mag last year, Lanphear has done her part to reinvent the glossy, starting with her revamped Hot 100 List that listed good girl Taylor Swift as number one. Now, for the first time ever, the magazine has published a cover that features — gasp — zero women. Idris Elba, manliest of men, instead stands alone on the cover of the September issue. [Racked]

What do Nick Cannon, Nas and Kevin Durant have in common? Well, apparently the trio strongly believes in tweens' desperate need for celebrity gossip, as they've all invested money in adolescent tabloid of yore, Tiger Beat. The men, along with a bevy of other big name investors, are helping the 50-year-old mag rebrand and give teen girls the one thing they can't find on the Internet: Full-size posters of teen heartthrobs. Some things never change. [Fashionista]

Read more Coach to Present First Runway Show at NYFW

Just in case you were worried that your toddler wasn't fashionable enough, Vogue U.K. has got you covered. Vogue.co.uk announced today that it was releasing Mini Vogue as a digtal children's wear supplement to its adult site. The new addition will not only feature designer and street labels for kids, but also parenting advice, maternity fashion and in-demand content like "newborn summer essentials." Gotta start 'em young. [WWD]

Many absurd things have been done in the name of fashion and advertising (see: Kim Kardashian's latest ad) but rarely do they tear at the heartstrings of middle-aged men. Rag & Bone, however, found a way to do it. For their fall campaign, the fashion house wrecked a vintage Porsche (with a concrete barrier, no less) and car enthusiasts nationwide have grieved the loss on social media. According to designer Marcus Wainwright, the ad was meant to capture the "intense energy of New York where anything can happen," but it looks like many a grown man fail to share his artistic vision. [Complex]

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