Pret-a-Reporter

5 Easy Reads for the Train Ride to Comic-Con (Or Anywhere, Really)

Courtesy of Knopf; Courtesy of Speak; Courtesy of Penguin Random House
Summer Reads

A jumping off point for anyone who's ever said, "I should read more." (You know who you are.)

Whether you're taking the Amtrak train to Comic-Con this weekend or just hanging out poolside, we've found the cure for your idle hours. Instead of aggressively stalking your ex on social media, put down your phone and pick up one of these fun, and most importantly, easy, summer reads for a relaxing break from reality. 

1. Paper Towns by John Green

Is there anything better than a young adult novel about unrequited love? We think not. Get your fix of teenage angst from The Fault in Our Stars author John Green before you head to theaters on July 24 to see Cara Delevingne's acting debut as the mysterious Margot Roth Spiegelman. You know you want to.

2. In the Unlikely Event by Judy Blume 

Are you there Judy? It's us, your loyal fans. On behalf of the generation that grew up with your children's novels stacked high on our nightstands, we'd like to thank you for publishing adult novels like In the Unlikely Event — the story of a series of mysterious plane crashes in the '50s. Really, we do appreciate it. 

See more See What the Stars Are Wearing at Comic-Con 2015

3. Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Another classic author, Harper Lee, has resurfaced with the sequel to everyone's favorite required high school read, To Kill a Mockingbird. Lee's second-ever novel picks up with Scout Finch 20 years after the whole Boo Radley fiasco. Read it July 14.

4. Dark Places by Gillian Flynn

If you've been going through Gillian Flynn withdrawals since reading (and re-reading) Gone Girl, Dark Places is the answer to your need for a good thriller. Familial drama, murder, farm houses — this book's got it all. The best part? The novel's already been made into a movie starring Charlize Theron and Chloe Grace Moretz.

5. The Knockoff by Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza

This novel pits over-confident millennials against technologically incompetent Gen X'ers and adds fashion, drama and a pinch of humor to make for a soon-to-be classic, forever wedged between your copy of The Devil Wears Prada and Grace Coddington's memoir. Thank us later.

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