Sun Valley Guest List 2014: Rupert Murdoch, Leslie Moonves, Jeffrey Katzenberg and More

Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch
Rupert and Lachlan Murdoch
 

About 250 people are expected at this year's Allen & Co. Sun Valley Conference, including a contingency from 21st Century Fox that includes CEO Rupert Murdoch, sons James and Lachlan and COO Chase Carey, The Hollywood Reporter has learned.

The annual gathering, which began in the 1980s and usually attracts many of the nation's most powerful media and technology executives, runs July 8-13 at the Sun Valley Resort in Idaho.

Also expected to attend the off-the-record event are DreamWorks Animation CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg, Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes, CBS CEO Leslie Moonves, Viacom CEO Philippe Dauman and Paramount Pictures head Brad Grey, sources told THR.

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is also on the guest list, according to Bloomberg, as are Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and three top executives from Walt Disney: CEO Robert Iger, CFO Jay Rasulo and chairman of the parks and resorts division, Thomas Staggs.

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was also invited, as was former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and The Weinstein Co. co-chairman Harvey Weinstein.

Allen & Co. is an investment firm and its yearly conference, while advertised as a low-key and low-pressure social affair, often yields some notable corporate deals, including mergers and acquisitions.

Five years ago, for example, executives from Comcast huddled with GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt at Sun Valley and five months later GE announced it was selling its controlling interest in NBCUniversal to the cable company.

A couple of years before that, chatter was everywhere at Sun Valley suggesting that Dow Jones & Co. was available for purchase, and just days after the conference ended it was announced that News Corp. would acquire the company.

And also having its genesis at Sun Valley was the acquisition of Time Warner by America Online, which began as a conversation between then-CEOs Gerald Levin and Steve Case and culminated in a $164 billion merger that generally is remembered as the worst deal in the history of corporate America.

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