Sydney Comic-Con Attendee Dressed as Slender Man Asked to Leave After Poking People

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The horror figure allegedly inspired two 12-year-old girls to stab their classmate 19 times

A tall 17-year-old dressed as online horror character Slender Man was asked to leave this month’s Oz Comic-Con in Sydney, Australia, after he walked around the venue poking people.

Daniel Simao tells Vice that he was asked to leave a Q&A session with Stargate SG-1 star Chris Judge, who seemed spooked by his character-appropriate lurking. He then walked around the event, “poking people,” he says. Simao claims his behavior was benign and included “placing my hand on people’s shoulder but taking it off immediately, and the occasional touching of the hair. … In no circumstances did I inappropriately touch someone.” He was asked by a volunteer and a few security guards “to stop touching people and invading their personal space.” A few hours later, after at least one more run-in with the guards, he was escorted out of the venue, Vice reports.

Oz Comic-Con event director Bernadette Neumann tells Vice that management received a number of complaints about Simao’s behavior.

SEE MORE 'Slender Man Made Me Do It': 10 Crimes Inspired by Pop Culture

“While management did not witness every single incident, the fact a number of complaints were made indicated there was an issue which needed to be addressed straight away,” she says. “Oz Comic-Con has a zero-tolerance policy on any form of harassment at these events. Anything that is reported to staff and security is immediately acted upon in the appropriate manner.”

Slender Man recently made news in the U.S. after two 12-year-old girls allegedly stabbed their classmate 19 times in order to please the fictional online horror character.

Simao says that incident didn’t inspire him to dress up like Slender Man.

“I chose the character cause he’s tall. I’m tall; it’s perfect for me,” he tells Vice.

A rep for Oz Comic-Con has not yet responded to The Hollywood Reporter’s request for comment.

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