Pret-a-Reporter

Target's "Plaid, Plaid World" Collaboration Surprisingly Wearable

Courtesy of Target
Adam Lippes for Target

Adam Lippes' fall line is less tartan, more chic.

When we first heard about Target's "Plaid, Plaid World" bonanza, which is part of its fall plaid-takeover event, we had visions of lumberjacks and kilt-clad Scottish folks parading in their finest tartans.

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But the Adam Lippes for Target collection, which is available in stores and online beginning Sept. 27, is a delightfully modern, more subtle approach to the buffalo plaid of "lumbersexual" infamy. The 50-plus-piece collection — which includes men's, women's and plus-size apparel, as well as shoes, accessories and select home goods — features a neutral palette of subtly checked pieces priced between $10 and $130.

"I think the plaid trend has never really gone away," said Adam Lippes in an interview with Marie Claire's Zanna Roberts Rassi. "It's always kind of been in the undercurrent of American sportswear." The New York native continued, "Over the years, it has really invaded high fashion. So now there's been great plaid gowns worn to gala events. People wear plaid to work. They wear it out on a Saturday night, and they still wear it, you know, for a real workman's shirt, so it's sort of all over now, which makes it so fun."

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With looks for daytime, as well as office- and eveningwear, the collection is the perfect blend of more trendy pieces (think: sleeveless trenches and crisp shirtdresses) and easy basics (V-neck shells and timeless turtleneck sweaters) that pair just as easily with denim as with slacks.

But while Lippes mastered the modern take on the classic fall pattern, the additional 360 plaid pieces that make up Target's bonanza (priced from $1.50 to $200) are every bit as bright as your inner leprechaun could dream. Let's just hope that the retailer is better prepared for the probable onslaught of plaid-hungry consumers than it's been in the past.

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