TCA: 'Desperate Housewives' Creator Shoots Down Idea of Feature Film

Desperate Housewives
Desperate Housewives
 Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Marc Cherry has one request: Stop asking him how he plans to wrap up his long-running drama, Desperate Housewives.

“I’m so not revealing what the ending will be,” he says, noting that his grand plan is to be hyper secretive and keep story lines from his cast. 

After eight seasons, ABC brass announced last summer that the once top rated series would get a chance to sign off on its own terms much the way Lost got to do years earlier. What Cherry will tell you about the last act is that it's an improved iteration of the version he’s had in his head for years. And when he finally gets it on the air, that’ll be it -- no reunions, no spin offs, no big screen sequels.

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“Boy, after eight years, I think we’re done,” he says during a stop at the Television Critics Association press tour Tuesday, reiterating that he has no desire to go the Sex and the City route with an ambitious big screen afterlife. His rationale: unlike the HBO series, which also explored the lives and loves of 40-something women, his show will have taken its characters to every imaginable place over the course of some 180 episodes. 

“I’m just never sending these gals to Dubai, that’s all I’m saying,” he says to laughs, adding that the advantage for Sex's producers "is that they hadn’t really plumbed the depth of those characters."

Getting more nostalgic as he and his cast reflect on the iconic series' past, Cherry appears pleasantly surprised by the impact -- on fashion, on television, on the American lexicon -- that the show has had. After joking that he'd like residuals from Bravo's popular Real Housewives franchise, he says, "whatever impact [this show] has had socially, I hope for the most part it’s a positive one."

Email: Lacey.Rose@THR.com; Twitter: @LaceyVRose

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