In Theaters This Weekend: Reviews of 'Boy Next Door,' 'Mortdecai' and More

'The Boy Next Door'

Read what THR's critics are saying about the Jennifer Aniston drama 'Cake' and the George Lucas-produced animated film 'Strange Magic.'

An obsessive teenager, a mustachioed art collector and a chronic-pain sufferer are heading to theaters this weekend with the releases of The Boy Next Door, Mortdecai and Cake.

Find out what The Hollywood Reporter's critics are saying about the weekend's new offerings (along with which film will top the weekend's box office).

The Boy Next Door

Jennifer Lopez, Ryan Guzman, John Corbett and Kristin Chenoweth star in director Rob Cohen's thriller about a young man who sleeps with and stalks his older neighbor. THR film critic Sheri Linden writes in her review that the film "offers January moviegoers some guilty-pleasure thrills and laughs, while falling way short of its potential on both the dramatic and the camp fronts."

Mortdecai

An art dealer attempts to retrieve a stolen painting in director David Koepp's action-comedy. Johnny Depp, Gwyneth Paltrow, Ewan McGregor and Paul Bettany star. "This charmless farce ends up as another black mark on Depp's recent track record of patchy pet projects," writes THR film critic Stephen Dalton in his review.

Strange Magic

Director Gary Rydstrom's animated fantasy film features the voice talents of Alan Cumming, Evan Rachel Wood, Kristin Chenoweth and Maya Rudolph in the story of magical creatures on a quest for a special potion. According to THR film Michael Rechtshaffen, "There's virtually nothing about this forced, fractured fairy tale that feels remotely fresh or involving." Read his full review here.

Cake

Jennifer Aniston, Adriana Barraza and Sam Worthington star in director Daniel Barnz's drama about a woman in a pain support group who is affected by an acquaintance's suicide. "Aniston submits an honest, sturdy performance," but the film "is less emotionally potent than it wants to be," writes THR film critic Leslie Felperin in her review.

Song One

A woman bonds with her recovering brother's favorite musician in director-writer Kate Barker-Froyland's drama. Anne Hathaway, Johnny Flynn and Mary Steenburgen round out the cast. THR film critic David Rooney writes in his review that "the delicate drama is sweet and sincere but a tad thin to resonate."

Email: Ryan.Gajewski@pgmedia.org
Twitter: @_RyanGajewski

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