In Theaters This Weekend: Reviews of 'If I Stay,' 'Sin City: A Dame to Kill For' and More

"If I Stay"
"If I Stay"
 Warner Bros.

Would you rather watch someone having an out-of-body experience, stylized violence or high school football? Moviegoers will be faced with that very decision this weekend, when If I Stay, Sin City: A Dame to Kill For and When the Game Stands Tall all open in theaters.

Find out what The Hollywood Reporter's critics are saying about the weekend's new offerings (along with which film will top the weekend's box office).

If I Stay

Chloe Grace Moretz, Mireille Enos, Jamie Blackley and Stacy Keach star in the film about a girl who has an out-of-body experience and must decide whether to return to her life or to die and join her family. R.J. Cutler makes his directorial debut with this adaptation of the best-selling YA novel. The film is hampered by its "lame dialogue, heartstring-yanking music and tired visual approach," and the central romance "has little electricity and near-zero substance," writes THR film critic Jon Frosch in his review

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

The sequel to 2005's Sin City stars Mickey Rourke, Jessica Alba, Josh Brolin, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Rosario Dawson and Bruce Willis. Co-directors Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez return for the film based on Miller's comics series of the same name and focused on the intense denizens of crime-ridden Sin City. "The big problem here is the sameness of the material throughout, the one-note tone," THR chief film critic Todd McCarthy writes in his review.

The Prince

Bruce Willis, John Cusack and Jason Patric star in director Brian A. Miller's thriller about a reformed hitman forced to confront his former life to rescue his kidnapped daughter. THR film critic Frank Scheck writes that the film is "strictly by the numbers" and "sorely illustrates that these talented actors are in desperate need of career reassessments." Read his full review here.

When the Game Stands Tall

Director Thomas Carter's (Save the Last Dance) drama about the real-life coach of a successful Bay Area high school football team stars Jim Caviezel, Laura Dern and Michael Chiklis. The film is a "paint-by-numbers tale" that is "too blandly acted and directed," according to THR film critic Stephen Farber's review.

Are You Here

Man Men creator Matthew Weiner wrote and directed this dramedy about two longtime friends who head back to their hometown to collect a hefty inheritance. Owen Wilson, Zach Galifianakis and Amy Poehler star. "This tonal mess rarely puts a foot right as a comedy and makes only marginal improvements when it turns poignant toward the end," writes THR film critic David Rooney in his review.

Love Is Strange

A gay couple get married but the two men have to live separately while crashing with friends in the drama from director Ira Sachs. Alfred Molina, John Lithgow, Marisa Tomei and Cheyenne Jackson star. The film is a "tender and meandering exploration of human relationships," says THR film critic Boyd van Hoeij in his review.

The One I Love

The romantic dramedy stars Mark Duplass, Elisabeth Moss and Ted Danson in the story of a couple in a rocky marriage who embark on an unusual weekend getaway. Director Charlie McDowell's film "has found a novel way to address the eternal issue of fading love and physical attraction," but it "can be incredibly trying, even annoying, to watch," according to McCarthy's review.

The Possession of Michael King

Director David Jung's found-footage horror flick stars Shane JohnsonElla Anderson and Cara Pifko and centers on a guy whose wife's death leads to him making a film about the supernatural. The film carries an "overwhelmingly stale air of familiarity" but features "some quirky, original touches," according to Scheck. Read his full review here. 

To Be Takei

Jennifer M. Kroot directed this documentary about Star Trek actor and activist George Takei. Rooney's review calls the film "structurally disorganized but mostly engaging."

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