TIFF 'Spotlight' Gala to Reunite Boston Sex Abuse Scandal Journalists (Exclusive)

Courtesy of Venice Film Festival
'Spotlight'

All six of the reporters and editors portrayed in the film will be on hand when the film debuts at the festival on Sept. 14.

Open Road is assembling the real-life Boston Globe team behind its film Spotlight at the Toronto Film Festival.

All six of the reporters and editors portrayed in the film will be on hand when the film debuts at the festival on Sept. 14. Walter "Robby" Robinson, Michael Rezendes, Sacha Pfeiffer, Matt Carroll, Marty Baron and Ben Bradlee Jr. will participate in an on-stage Q&A -- along with the six actors and actresses who portray them -- after the premiere.

The TIFF premiere also will mark the first time that Spotlight stars Michael Keaton (Robinson), Mark Ruffalo (Rezendes), Rachel McAdams (Pfeiffer), Brian d’Arcy James (Carroll), Liev Schreiber (Baron) and John Slattery (Bradlee) have all converged to introduce the film. Ruffalo was at the Venice Film Festival last week when the film premiered there, and Keaton and McAdams were in Telluride over the weekend for Spotlight's debut there.

In the same vein as All the President's Men, the film chronicles the true story about a team of Boston Globe reporters who uncovered a massive scandal of child abuse and cover-ups within the local Catholic Church. Participant Media, the socially focused company behind An Inconvenient Truth, financed and produced the project.

Spotlight director and co-writer Tom McCarthy and co-writer Josh Singer also will participate at the TIFF premiere as well as the producers Michael Sugar, Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin, and Blye Pagon Faust.

The film is certain to spark heated discussion given its subject matter of clergy pedophilia. Coming into the festival, the movie had a Toronto connection given that it was shot in the city as well as in Boston.

The premiere will mark something of a reunion for the six journalists, who won the Pulitzer Prize in 2003 but no longer work together as a team. Baron is now executive editor of The Washington Post. Bradlee resigned from the Globe in 2004 to write a biography of Ted Williams titled The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams, which became a New York Times bestseller and has been optioned for film.

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