Toronto: Second Cory Monteith Film Gets World Premiere

Cory Monteith
Cory Monteith
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TORONTO – Cory Monteith's final two movies will have their world premieres at the upcoming Toronto International Film Festival.

Festival organizers on Tuesday said they booked a world premiere for Josh C. Waller's McCanick, in which the late Glee star plays a street hustler struggling with addiction.

Toronto earlier booked another world premiere for the Canadian indie All The Wrong Reasons, in which Monteith stars as a department store manager.

Monteith died on July 13 in Vancouver from an accidental overdose of alcohol and heroin.

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McCanick and All The Wrong Reasons, both of which allowed Monteith to show a different persona than the one showcased on Glee, should have heartbroken Gleeks making a solemn pilgrimage to Toronto next month.

And as TIFF unveiled more of its September lineup on Tuesday, Fred Schepisi's Words and Pictures and Guillaume Canet's Blood Ties, both to receive gala premieres in Toronto next month, should also make Clive Owen the toast of Roy Thomson Hall.

Schepisi's drama, in which Owen stars opposite Juliette Binoche as battling artist-teachers in a New England prep school, gets a world bow in Toronto.

Owen will also be at Roy Thomson Hall when Canet's Blood Ties, a Roadside Attractions release that also stars Mila Kunis and Marion Cotillard receives a North American premiere after bowing in Cannes.

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TIFF is also hosting the North American premiere of Marion Vernoux's coming-of-old-age dramedy Bright Days Ahead, which stars Fanny Ardant, Patrick Chesnais and Laurent Lafitte.

Toronto's Special Presentations sidebar will also give first looks to Arie Posin's romantic drama The Face of Love, starring Annette Bening and Ed Harris, ahead of its September release by IFC Films, and John Turturro's Fading Gigolo, which features Turturro as an aging male escort and Woody Allen as his pimp.

The sidebar also booked world bows for Kevin Macdonald's sci-fi teen drama How I Live Now, due for a November Magnolia Pictures release; The Last of Robin Hood, the Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland theatrical drama starring Kevin Kline based on the true story of Errol Flynn's affair with a 15-year-old actress; and Lucky Them, Megan Griffiths' romantic comedy that stars Toni Collette, Thomas Haden Church and Oliver Platt.

The festival will also feature world debuts for Charles Stratton's Therese, starring Elizabeth Olsen and Glenn Close, Nils Tavernier's The Finishers, Dexter Fletcher's Sunshine on Leith, Alberto Arvelo's The Liberator and Love is the Perfect Crime, from directors Arnaud Larrieu and Jean-Marie Larrieu.

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The Special Presentations lineup will also include North American premieres for Alex Gibney's renamed Lance Armstrong doc, The Armstrong Lie, Patrice Leconte's A Promise, Hong Kong director Johnnie To's Blind Detective and James Franco's Child of God, which is to bow in competition in Venice.

Also on Tuesday Toronto rounded out its Contemporary World Cinema program with world premieres for Club Sandwich, by Mexican director Fernando Eimbcke; Brazilian director Fernando Coimbra's A Wolf at the Door; Mariana Rondon's Bad Hair; Nejib Belkadhi's Bastardo, a Tunisia-France-Qatar co-production; Georgian director Levan Koguashvili's Blind Dates; and Break Loose, by Russian director Alexey Uchitel.

And the world cinema sidebar has first looks for Lisa Langseth's Hotell; Norwegian director Lars Daniel Krutzkoff's The Immoral; Korean director Noh Young-Seok's Intruders; Donovan Marsh's iNumber Number, from South Africa; Mohamad Malas' Ladder to Damascus; Alexandre Rockwell's Little Feet, Old Moon, by Raisa Bonnet; and Rashid Masharawi's Palestine Stereo.

The Toronto International Film Festival is set to run from Sept. 5-15.

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