TV-Related Tweets More Likely to Motivate Viewing: Study

8:58 AM PST 03/24/2014 by THR Staff
Adam Taylor/FOX
New Girl

A study from Fox, Twitter and the Advertising Research Foundation found that a majority of people who see such tweets are likely to either check out a series for the first time or resume watching a show they'd previously stopped watching.

Tweets about TV shows are likely to spur people to watch a particular show, even if they've never seen it before, according to a study released Monday by Fox, Twitter and the Advertising Research Foundation.

The study, titled "Discovering the Value of Earned Audience -- How Twitter Expressions Activate Consumers," found that the majority of people who recall seeing TV-related tweets are likely to take "immediate action" around a given show, either checking out a series for the first time or watching a show they'd previously stopped watching.

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According to the study, 76 percent of people who recall seeing TV-related tweets have searched for a show, 78 percent have taken action on Twitter (clicking a hashtag, following a talent handle or retweeting) and 77 percent have taken action to watch show content.

In regard to watching show content, 42 percent have made plans to watch the show later, 38 percent have watched episodes online and 33 percent have changed the channel to watch the show.

The study also looked at tweets that mention brands, finding that viewers who recall seeing tweets mentioning a show's brand partners are "more likely to view that brand as appealing and pay more attention to that brand's on-air ads than the general Twitter TV audience."

Specifically, 54 percent of those who recall seeing such tweets have followed up by tweeting, searching for the brand online or considering trying the brand. This figure jumps to 58 percent when measuring actions taken by the live-TV-tweeting audience, the study found.

The study, conducted by research consultancy db5 on behalf of Fox and Twitter, consisted of 12,577 people recruited on Twitter who were surveyed within 24 hours of primetime Twitter activity.

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