'Unnatural' helming role for rookie

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Stuber/Parent has pre-emptively acquired "Unnatural Selection," a romantic comedy script by first-time feature filmmaker Cameron Fay. In a rare move, Fay also will direct the movie, which will be produced by Mary Parent and Scott Stuber and released by Universal Pictures.

The New York-set story centers on a brilliant underachiever who has a surefire way of getting women to sleep with him. His technique is put to the test when he meets a divorced mom with a kid, forcing him to reassess his life.

Fay, a native of Fairfax, Va., graduated from New York University film school in 2003. His senior short film, "Fishing for Trauster," won audience awards at several festivals, including the Chicago Shorts Film Festival and the Valley Film Festival.

Fay moved to Los Angeles after graduation, taking odd jobs including a personal assistant to songwriters and script reading -- "any job in the industry that you can be meeting people but have time to write," he said.

He wrote what he called "some bad scripts" and made two short films; "Tom's War on Terror" is premiering next week at the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, and "Redemption Song" is premiering this week at the Sedona International Film Festival.

"It was out of the blue," Fay said of the deal. "I woke up last Tuesday and I got an e-mail from my manager Ilan (Breil) that said, 'Mary Parent read the script and wants to meet.' We met on Wednesday, and she infected me with her passion, and Thursday they bought it."

He said he got the directing gig by speaking in visual terms. "They immediately got behind me and said another director would not serve the script's voice as well," he said. "It's kind of shocking how supportive they are."

Fay is repped by UTA and Mosaic.

Scott Bernstein is the Universal Pictures production executive on the project. Alexa Faigen will oversee for Stuber/Parent.

Stuber/Parent is producing "The Kingdom," directed by Peter Berg, for a September release, and prepping "Big Brothers" with Seann William Scott and Paul Rudd.
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