Pret-a-Reporter

Vivienne Westwood's New Campaign Is All About Saving Venice

Courtesy of Vivenne Westwood
Vivienne Westwood's spring 2016 campaign.

The designer is using her voice once again to address climate issues.

No stranger to voicing her opinions on global issues, especially when it comes to the environment, Vivienne Westwood is using her spring 2016 campaign as a platform to continue the conversation.

The ads, called "Mirror the World" and lensed by Juergen Teller, were shot around the alleys, canals, shipyards and palazzos of Venice to highlight the problems with mass tourism and the impact of climate changes.

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"The lagoon is one of the most wonderful wetlands in the world: exquisite symbiosis between the animals and plants that stabilize the sediment from the freshwater rivers and Venice itself which has grown with the lagoon," said Westwood. "If Venice were not there the wetlands would have become either land or a bay — the sea having swept away the sediment. The biggest problem now seems to be the cruise ships which tear up the lagoon. It’s a total false economy to allow them."

Westwood also credited scientist Contessa Jane da Mosto for her work in saving the Italian city, adding, "The Contessa says that Venice is 'the canary in the mine.' If we can’t save Venice, how do we save the world?"

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Most recently, the designer and her husband, Andreas Kronthaler, hosted the Art of Elysium gala in Culver City, where she expressed that fashion has given her the opportunity to speak more on environmental issues.

"[Fashion] just gives me an excuse to open my mouth. I have credibility from it, and I do use it," she told The Hollywood Reporter. "I don’t even talk about the fashion. Mass extinction, only 1 billion people left by the end of this century — how can you talk about fashion? You’ve got to talk about what we’re going to do."

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