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JAN
13
2 YEARS

Golden Globes 2013: Scott Feinberg's Backstage Diary

THR's chief awards blogger watched the HFPA's yearly awards-cast from one of the best seats in the house -- backstage at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Here's a category-by-category breakdown of insta-analysis.

Golden Globes Homeland Cast Award - H 2013
Paul Drinkwater/NBC

This is the 70th Golden Globes. The Oscars are older -- their 85th ceremony will take place next month.

(First category to be announced: Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture)
 
This is going to be best supporting actor. Robert De Niro (Silver Linings Playbook) was not nominated, probably because he insulted the HFPA while accepting their lifetime achievement award two year ago. Django Unchained's Leonardo DiCaprio and Christoph Waltz were both nominated here, but only Waltz for an Oscar. And yet DiCaprio could still win because the HFPA loves A-listers. Still, the win will probably be Tommy Lee Jones for Lincoln, the most nominated film tonight.
 
(Christoph Waltz wins Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture)
 
In something of an upset, Waltz manages to avoid a split with his co-star and claims the first Globe of the night. This is a big visibility boost for him going forward. He also won this award three years ago for another Tarantino movie, Inglourious Basterds.
 
Harvey Weinstein, whose films have 14 noms tonight, and who literally bought the HFPA's lunch recently, smiles as Waltz, the star of his film Django, accepts his prize.
 
It's always odd when Maggie Smith and Sofia Vergara are nominated in the same category, but that's best supporting actress in a TV series for you at the Globes... 
 
(Maggie Smith wins Best Supporting Actress, TV)
 
Smith wins, but could not be with us tonight because she doesn't give a crap about awards, having already won at least one of every one that exists.
 
After the break, the always special presentation of the Miss -- and Mr. -- Golden Globe Awards to Clint Eastwood's daughter and Michael J. Fox's son. If you've been holding it in, now is an ideal time to hit the bathroom.
 
Best TV Mini-Series or Movie: Downton Abbey is out of this category this year, so it's either Game Change or Hatfields & McCoys. My hunch: The HFPA goes for Palin biopic.
 
('Game Change' wins Best TV Movie or Miniseries)
 
Next up, Best Actress in a TV Mini-Series or Movie. It pits awards magnets/movie stars Julianne Moore (Game Change) vs. Jessica Lange (American Horror Story) vs. Nicole Kidman (Hemingway & Gelhorn) vs. Sigourney Weaver (Political Animals), among others. I think Moore's Palin transformation will prevail, but Lange won here last year so you never know.
 
(Julianne Moore wins Best Performance by an Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie)
 
Waltz just arrived backstage to meet the press. Waltz is being incredibly curt in replying to the press' admittedly stupid questions.
 
Next up: one of the most thrilling moments of the evening (jk), the greeting of the president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, feisty octogenarian Aida Takla-O'Reilly. Try to remain calm.
 
Ms. Takla-O'Reilly has been a member of the HFPA since 1956. That's a lot of free food, alcohol and photos with movie stars! God bless her. 
 
Best Actor in a TV Series (Drama): Steve Buscemi is an HFPA favorite. Jeff Daniels is in the category for The Newsroom for the first time. They often like to crown a winner before other groups. But I have to go with Damien Lewis (Homeland), the surprise Emmy winner.
 
(Damien Lewis wins Best Actor in a TV Series)
 
I wonder how many people think Sgt. Brody is faking a British accent right now.
 
The Best TV Series (Drama) category is coming up momentarily. Expect Homeland to win there, too, over formidable competition including The Newsroom (in its first year of eligibility), Breaking Bad and Boardwalk Empire, a past Globe winner. Not even nominated tonight, oddly: Mad Men.
 
(In announcing the Best Drama Series category, Paul Rudd's teleprompter breaks down.)
 
I thought that Paul Rudd knew how to improvise...
 
Tony Mendez, the guy played by Ben Affleck in Argo, is out onstage. As he said at the Palm Springs Film Fest recently, "We never thought that our 'Hollywood option' would be optioned by Hollywood!"
 
The Best Original Score category features the legendary John Williams, the co-director of Cloud Atlas, Tom Tykwer and the prolific Alexandre Desplat, whose Argo score is just one of five or six that he churned out this year. I think Desplat might edge Williams. In either case, it could presage the outcome of their films' Best Picture (Drama) matchup, still to come.
 
(Mychael Danna's score for Life of Pi wins Best Film Score.)
 
Wow -- Danna, who was also nominated for the best original song and best original score Oscars last week, told me earlier this week that almost gave up his pursuit of a career in composing not all that long ago. Needless to say, he's happy he didn't.
 
Now the Best Original Song presentation, the nominees for which include Keith Urban, Taylor Swift, Jon Bon Jovi, Adele and others. The Globes love a big star. Adele is the favorite for the title song for Skyfall, but Les Mis is big with the HFPA.
 
(Adele's "Skyfall" wins Best Original Song)
 
Adele, who recently dropped her latest release -- a baby -- high-fives 007 himself, Daniel Craig, and then melts down onstage.
 
Brody's daughter from Homeland just came backstage wearing a dress that is more than a tad too low-cut...
 
Best Actor in a TV Movie or Mini-Series will be a fight between movie stars Kevin Costner, Woody Harrelson and Clive Owen, plus Benedict Cumberbatch and Toby Jones. The Emmys went with Costner (Hatfields & McCoys). The HFPA will probably follow suit.
 
(Kevin Costner wins Best Performance by an Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie)
 
Kevin Costner, it's not a crime to smile.
 
(Former President Bill Clinton comes onstage for the Lincoln presentation)
 
Wow, President Clinton is here, and the place goes wild -- standing ovation! Even if Lincoln loses Best Picture (Drama) tonight, it has won the night with that endorsement by the most popular guy in Hollywood, Bill Clinton.
 
Best Actress (Musical or Comedy) is Jennifer Lawrence's to lose for her star-making perf in Silver Linings Playbook. I can't imagine them giving it to Blunt, Dench, Smith or Streep.
 
Will Ferrell and Kristen Wiig even have Dustin Hoffman laughing... not easy to do! They're somewhat less successful with Tommy Lee Jones.
 
(Jennifer Lawrence wins Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy)
 
"Harvey, thank you for killing whoever you had to kill to get me up here today." -J-Law
 
"Bill Cinton pretty much just got LINCOLN the Oscar." -- screenwriter/Academy member Rod Lurie via Facebook
 
Best Supporting Actor in a TV Series or Mini-Series: This one seems like it's between the incredibly different Mandy Patinkin (Homeland) and Eric Stonestreet (Modern Family) -- maybe Ed Harris (Game Change) -- with Max Greenfield (New Girl) and Danny Huston (Magic City) just along for the ride. I say Patinkin on the coattails of his immensely popular show.
 
(Ed Harris wins Best Supporting Actor in a TV or Mini-Series)
 
It's Harris -- read the wrong coattails! 
 
Django Unchained star Jamie Foxx is this year's Mark Wahlberg for The Fighter -- the star of a film for which all of his co-stars got nominated but he did not.
 
Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture is supposedly as signed, sealed and delivered as any category save for Daniel Day-Lewis' Best Actor (Drama) category. Look for Anne Hathaway to win in a walk over Helen Hunt, Nicole Kidman, Amy Adams and Sally Field for Les Mis.
 
(Anne Hathaway wins Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture)
 
J-Law tells the press that "Come on Baby Light My Fire" is the song that makes her want to flip out in the way that the song in Silver Linings Playbook makes Bradley Cooper want to flip out.
 
Robert Pattinson and Amanda Seyfried, noted writers and intellectuals, will now come out to present best screenplay -- which is separated into two categories at the Oscars, but is just one here. In other words, Tony Kushner (Lincoln) or Chris Terrio (Argo) v. Quentin Tarantino (Django Unchained) or David O. Russell (Silver Linings) can only happen here. Tarantino is gonna be awfully hard for these guys to resist, but none of the aforementioned nominees would really surprise me. Mark Boal (up for the controversial Zero Dark Thirty) would.
 
Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone come out to present best foreign film, if only because neither of them is understandable in English.
 
(Amour wins Best Foreign Language Film.)
 
If the beautiful but downer/star-less Amour can win even with the star-loving HFPA, then it can win anywhere.
 
Michel Haneke jokes that he never thought he'd get an award from another Austrian (Schwarzenegger).
 
(Claire Danes wins Best Performance by an Actress in a TV series, Drama)
 
Claire Danes has been a favorite of the HFPA for many years, going back to My So-Called Life, Temple Grandin, etc.
 
After the commercial break, Best Animated Film will be presented. It's one that is particularly interesting to awards-watchers, since there really is no clear front-runner in the category. We've got Pixar's Brave, Tim Burton's Frankenweenie, the blockbusters Hotel Transylvania and Wreck-It Ralph and DreamWorks' Oscar-snubbed Rise of the Guardians.
 
"Please no n-gger questions. Black people questions are all right." -- Don Cheadle's first words after replacing Quentin Tarantino at the press room mic.
 
(Brave wins Best Animated Film)
 
Brave co-director Mark Andrews, a longtime storyboard artist who just won Best Animated Feature for his first feature film, is a terrific guy. I had lunch with him yesterday and he's as animated and likable as any movie in the category, as you're about to see.
 
Nominees for Best Actress in TV Series (Musical or Comedy) include Lena Dunham (Girls), TV Critics' Choice Award winner Zooey Deschanel (New Girl), Julia Louis-Dreyfuss (Veep) and tonight's co-hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler. No idea what to expect. Dunham would certainly be the hip choice.
 
(Lena Dunham wins Best Actress in a TV Series, Musical or Comedy)
 
About time Lena Dunham won something for her incredible work on "Girls."
 
(Jodie Foster gives her speech after accepting the Cecil B. DeMille award)
 
"I know that you're disappointed that there won't be a big coming-out speech tonight." Jodie Foster chokes up thanking Mel Gibson.
 
Did Jodie Foster just retire?
 
Coming up next: Best Director is between the five directors of the Best Picture (Drama) nominees: Affleck (Argo), Bigelow (Zero Dark Thirty), Ang Lee (Life of Pi), Spielberg (Lincoln) and Tarantino (Django Unchained). It's somewhat odd that none of the Best Picture (Musical or Comedy) nominees were included, especially because the HFPA loves Silver Linings Playbook and musicals like Les Mis. But this category's winner will, in all likelihood, reveal who is going to win the tight Best Picture (Drama) race.
 
Based on the HFPA's affinity for A-list actors turned directors -- they've previously presented this prize to Redford (Ordinary People), Beatty (Reds), Streisand (Yentl), Huston (Prizzi's Honor), Costner (Dances with Wolves), Gibson (Braveheart) and Eastwood (Bird, Unforgiven and Million Dollar Baby) -- I think it's probably reasonable to expect that Affleck will win for Argo, even if Spielberg was Oscar-nominated and he was not, in what would be a repeat of the Critics' Choice Movie Awards of last Thursday night.
 
(Ben Affleck wins Best Director for Argo)
 
The audience gives a standing-O and the press room cheers as Affleck is announced as the winner. First write-in best director Oscar winner in history?
 
Jodie Foster just arrived backstage. Get ready...
 
"I don't know what you mean... I wanted to say what's most on my heart."  -- Jodie Foster on why she decided to raise the subject that she doesn't actually want to address tonight
 
(Girls wins Best TV Series, Comedy or Musical)
 
The Globes just did the right thing and honored Girls!
 
Jodie Foster has press room absolutely silent for first time tonight.
 
The next two categories that will be presented will be Best Actor (Musical or Comedy) and Best Picture (Musical or Comedy), which both pit the musical Les Miserables against dramedy Silver Linings Playbook, in the form of Hugh Jackman and Bradley Cooper. The HFPA has a long history of rewarding musicals over nonmusicals, even when the nonmusicals wind up getting Oscar love and the musicals do not, i.e. Evita over Fargo and Jerry Maguire (1996), Dreamgirls over Little Miss Sunshine (2006) and Sweeney Todd over Juno (2007). The buzz is that a LOT of members of the HFPA adored Silver Linings, but I still expect that Jackman and Les Mis will pull it out. (That being said, Oscar-snubbed Jack Black would certainly be a deserving upset winner... but don't hold your breath.)
 
Peggy Siegal airtime!
 
Anne Hathaway's wide-eyed, short-haired shtick is eerily reminiscent of Liza Minnelli.
 
(Les Miserables wins Best Picture, Musical or Comedy)
 
The Les Mis win is fascinating, in terms of the Oscars: Only one movie in the last 80 years has won best picture without a best director nom. It did not get one. No movie in the last 32 years has won best picture without a best film editing nom. It did not get one. No movie in the last 15 years has won best picture without a screenplay nom. It did not get one. And yet here, at the Globes, it beat Silver Linings, which got all of them -- plus acting noms in all four acting categories (the first film to do so in 31 years). Can it defy history? We'll see.
 
Also worth noting: The HFPA, though it gets to name two films best picture, frequently fails to anticipate the film that wins with the Academy. Last year the two groups agreed on The Artist, but the year before the HFPA went for The Social Network over The King's Speech, the Academy's eventual choice, and the year before the HFPA went for Avatar over The Hurt Locker, the Academy's eventual choice.
 
Lena Dunham made up for Hilary Swank's oversight by thanking Chad Lowe, Swank's ex-husband!
 
Best Actress in a Drama: The odds say Jessica Chastain for the buzzed-about movie Zero Dark Thirty, and that's my pick, but you should also watch out for Watts.
 
(Jessica Chastain wins Best Actress in a Drama)
 
Chastain prevails, repeating her Critics' Choice Movie Award win of Thursday evening. She chokes up on the stage. And she will give Lawrence a real run for her money at the Oscars.
 
Chastain thanks Bigelow a LOT.
 
(Daniel Day-Lewis wins Best Actor in a Drama)
 
"Are you sure there's room for another ex-president on this stage?" -- Daniel Day-Lewis
 
You do NOT play Daniel Day-Lewis off the stage, musicians. Jesus.
 
The biggest movie star of her generation, Julia Roberts, is about to present Best Picture (Drama) award. Based on Affleck's win for Best Director, one has to assume that Argo is out front here, as I predicted in our recent print edition. Most people just don't like to break up the best picture and best director categories if they can avoid it. Tonight they would have to, since the Best Director nominees are all the directors of the Best Picture (Drama) nominees. I don't expect that to happen -- even if Lincoln and Django are also immensely popular with the HFPA.
 
(Argo wins Best Picture, Drama)
 
Argo wins, repeating its Critics' Choice triumph of Thursday night. George Clooney, as one of its producers, is among the winners of this award, along with his producing partner Grant Heslov and the film's star Ben Affleck.
 
Could Argo become only the second film in 80 years to win the best picture Oscar without having received a best director Oscar nom? It's building a strong case, but that's a lot of history to bet against.