Sarah Jessica Parker Explains Her No-Nudity Stance

Parker, star of HBO's 'Divorce,' has kept the clause a staple in her contracts since her six seasons on 'Sex and the City.' "It's fantastic that people feel comfortable doing it. It's not a principled position or religious or ideological on my part," Parker tells THR.
Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images
Sarah Jessica Parker at 'Divorce' premiere.

Sarah Jessica Parker famously had a no-nudity contract clause during her six seasons on Sex and the City, and fans of her new HBO series Divorce might have guessed she has one again.

“I’ve always had one, and it’s apropos of absolutely nothing,” Parker tells THR. “Some people have a perks list and they are legendary. They have to have white candles in their room. I don’t have a crazy list like that. I’ve just always had [a no-nudity clause].”

Though HBO seems to have the most number of stars contractually obliged to go au naturel, Parker remains one of the exceptions. During her three-plus-decade TV and movie career, only once did the clause become an issue, during production of a movie she declines to name. The movie included a sex scene, and the actor said, “’I’m gonna be out of my clothing.’ I said, ‘Fantastic. That’s wonderful you feel comfortable doing it,’” Parker recalls but held her ground.

Still, the actress wants to be perfectly clear that despite the fact that nudity isn’t her cup of tea, she has no issue with anyone else — including her former SATC co-stars — disrobing. “I don’t have any judgment about anyone who chooses to do it,” she says. “I think it’s fantastic that people feel comfortable doing it. It’s not some kind of principled position or religious or ideological on my part.”

Perhaps after the Oct. 30 epic orgy scene on Westworld, other HBO actors and actresses might follow Parker’s lead? Or at least insist on a robot stand-in.

A version of this story first appeared in the Nov. 11 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

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