Fix -- Film Review

Jason Kempin/Getty Images
"Fix" is badly in need of one. This grungy, microbudget road movie clearly harkens back to the 1960s in terms of its rough-hewn style and druggie orientation. But although it was made just last year, it feels just as dated as that era's films.

The sole redeeming factor is the presence of Olivia Wilde (Fox's "House"), who manages to keep the proceedings watchable for at least a portion of the running time. (The director/co-writer, Tao Ruspoli, is Wilde's real-life spouse.)

The director also plays a central role and wields the camera for most of the time, befitting his character's status as a filmmaker recording the events for no determinable reason. The conceit is that Milo (Ruspoli) and his romantic/professional partner Bella (Wilde) are escorting the former's drug-addict brother Leo (Shawn Andrews) to a stint in court-ordered rehab.

Unfortunately, said rehab requires an entrance fee of $5,000, necessitating the trio to journey throughout the environs of Los Angeles in search of the money. This entails a variety of schemes involving stolen cars, the buying and reselling of a pound of high-grade marijuana, etc., which is probably not what the legal authorities had in mind.

None of the main characters is particularly engaging. The largely unseen Milo wields his camera like a weapon; Bella mostly complains a lot; and Leo clearly is a con artist, though not one who could fool anybody who wasn't already on drugs.

The filmmaker employs a variety of low-tech visual tricks in an attempt to sustain audience interest, but they mainly come across as cliches. The fact that Wilde still manages to look beautiful despite the highly unflattering photography is a testament to her luminosity.

Opens Friday, Nov. 20
Production: LAFCO, Mangusta
Cast: Olivia Wilde, Tao Ruspoli, Shawn Andrews, Megalyn Echikunwoke, Dedee Pfeiffer.
Director: Tao Ruspoli
Screenwriters: Tao Ruspoli, Jeremy Fels
Producer: Nat Dinga
Executive producers: Christopher Redlich, Ciancarlo Canavesio, Cher Helina, Robert Kandle
Directors of photography: Christopher Gallo, Tao Ruspoli
Editor: Paul Forte
Production designers: Sarah Osbourne, Erin Eagleton
Rated R, 90 minutes
comments powered by Disqus