'Jeremy Scott: The People's Designer': Film Review

Courtesy of The Vladar Company
Strictly for fashionistas.

Vlad Yudin's documentary profiles the fashion designer, who has a large celebrity following.

At one point in the new documentary chronicling his life and career, famed fashion designer Jeremy Scott talks about the many disparaging reviews he's received for his work. Not surprisingly, he has little use for his detractors.

"I don't think I've ever seen a statue of a critic," he comments, before adding with an exaggerated sneer and upraised fingers, "Take that, bitches!"

It's understandable that Scott feels a bit peevish. As Vlad Yudin's Jeremy Scott: The People's Designer illustrates, he hasn't exactly been a critics' darling throughout his career. But he's clearly tapped into the pop culture zeitgeist, and his celebrity champions in the film include Katy Perry (who wore his designs for her performance at the 2015 Super Bowl halftime show), Miley Cyrus, Jared Leto, Paris Hilton, Rita Ora and many others. Among his more recent accomplishments, although not discussed in the film, are his costume designs for Madonna's current tour.

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Born and raised in rural Missouri, Scott made his way to New York City but was rejected by FIT because his work showed a "lack of creativity and originality." He wound up studying fashion at Pratt Institute and soon enjoyed a meteoric career rise that led to his becoming the creative director of Moschino in 2013. He was the first American to take charge of a major Italian brand.

"I don’t speak Italian, but I do speak Moschino," he announces.

Unfortunately for him, his debut collection for the company which he informed one journalist would be "nutritious and delicious" widely was derided. Inspired by the fast-food chain McDonald's, it premiered to scathing notices, with one headline proclaiming that the new collection "has ruined fashion forever."

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The film recounts all this and more in workmanlike, worshipful manner, mainly content to let Scott strut his stuff amid a glitzy parade of celebrities and models. It doesn't delve too deeply into its subject's psyche or provide much context for his work, but fashionistas are likely to be entertained.

The most evocative segment concerns Scott's trip home to see his farmer parents and his sister, with the latter explaining that he had a tough childhood and frequently was bullied at school. Scott is seen wandering into a field and talking to the cows, complimenting one on its "earring" (actually a number tag). It's a vivid illustration of exactly how far the designer, who now makes his home in Beverly Hills, has come.

Production: The Vladar Co.
Director: Vlad Yudin
Producers: Edwin Mejia, Vlad Yudin
Executive producer: Matt Kapp
Director of photography: Colin Morvan
Editor: Matthew Adams

PG-13, 110 minutes

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