Judge Jeanine Pirro

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Airdate: 3 p.m. weekdays

The CW


LOS ANGELES -- Did the CW network somehow miss the memo that TV wouldn't be needing any new judge shows until at least 2016?

Evidently so, because here comes Judge Jeanine Pirro, a one-time district attorney and judge in Westchester County, N.Y., who ran losing campaigns for the U.S. Senate and New York state attorney general in 2006. She's also accused of having hired former New York City Police Commissioner Bernard Kerik to illegally record her husband, whom she suspected was having an affair. Apparently, these are considered lofty qualifications for standing in judgment of various penny-ante losers from behind a bench, because here we find Pirro doing her best impression of Judges Judy Scheindlin and Joseph Wapner rolled into one. It airs at the same time on CW stations nationally as part of a new daytime lineup, which means it'll be taking on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in many markets. Good luck, your honor. You're gonna need it.

The show is little different from "Judge Judy" and "The People's Court." Lower-class people -- or at least those who don't mind embarrassing themselves on national television -- appear seeking money or trying to hide from responsibility. There's the woman accused of beating and stealing from relatives; the middle-aged man who got taken to the cleaners by a gold-digger who claims to be a lesbian; and the neighbors who tossed bleach onto a woman and her kid in an act of alleged retaliation. Throughout, Judge Pirro makes like Judge Judy to admonish with a wagging finger in the face and a stern tone. She's perfectly adequate as a TV judge, but she is nothing particularly distinctive, either.

Production: AND Syndicated Prods., Telepictures Prods. and Warner Bros. Domestic TV Distribution. Executive producer: Bo Banks. Director: Joey Ford.
Co-executive producer: Jill Olsen.
Supervising producer: Melissa Porter.
Production designer: Mark Solan.
Editors: Gloria Almada, David Heniff, Liza Schroeder.
Lighting designer: John Conti.


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