'You've Been Trumped Too': Film Review

Courtesy of Montrose Pictures
This unnecessary follow-up rehashes too much familiar material.

Anthony Baxter delivers a sequel to his 2011 film about the GOP presidential candidate's clashes with Scottish citizens while building a luxury golf course.

It's not surprising that Anthony Baxter has made a follow-up to his 2011 documentary You've Been Trumped. When the first film — about the Donald's rapacious tactics building a luxury golf course in Balmedie, Scotland, near Aberdeen — was released, Trump was just a callous businessman willing to step over anything and anyone in his way. Now he's poised to possibly become the leader of the free world. Unfortunately, for all its timeliness and social-minded passion, You've Been Trumped Too is a mostly unnecessary sequel that spends much of its brief running time rehashing distressingly familiar news footage about Trump's campaign.

This film's main hook is the story of 92-year-old Scottish widow Molly Forbes and her farmer son Michael, who have been without running water for five years since Trump's construction crew broke a crucial pipe near their property. Despite Trump's promises that he would fix the problem, nothing was ever done, as is evident by the footage of the indomitable Molly fetching buckets of water to use in her kitchen. In an interview, Trump speaks nicely about the elderly woman, saying that she reminds him of his mother.

"He mustn't have treated her very well, then," Molly bitterly comments. Regarding the prospect of his becoming president, she says, "I hope it doesn't happen, for America's sake. And for the world's."

Trump and his equally obnoxious son Donald Jr. have little use for Michael Forbes, mainly because he commits the unpardonable offense of not being elegant. Donald derisively refers to "the disgusting condition in which he lives," while his son ridicules Forbes' decrepit, rusty tractor. Donald Jr. jokes that he'll personally hand over the golf course to the farmer if he's able to make it run … which, as we see by the end of the film, Forbes triumphantly does.

The film provides follow-up information to the earlier effort, including the galling fact that the golf course, which was supposed to provide thousands of jobs, has resulted in fewer than one hundred. As a result of this and other transgressions, some 500,000 British citizens signed a petition calling for Trump to be banned from the U.K.

There's really not enough new material here on which to peg a feature film, with such segments as Forbes traveling to America and confronting Trump supporters in various places providing little insight. Even more strangely, Trump, who had refused to talk to Baxter for the first film, did agree to an interview after that documentary aired on the BBC. But other than footage depicting preparations for the interview, including Trump asking which camera to focus on, virtually none of the conversation is included.

It's a shame, because there hasn't really been a feature documentary that's taken on Trump since he announced his candidacy, while there have been several about Hillary … so much for the power of the "left-wing media."

Distributor: Montrose Pictures
Production companies: Montrose Pictures, Creative Scotland
Director-editor: Anthony Baxter
Screenwriter-producer: Richard Phinney
Executive producer: Mark Thomas
Composer: Dominic Glynn

Not rated, 78 minutes

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