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MAY
1
4 YEARS

How Will Osama Bin Laden Death Impact Kathryn Bigelow's 'Kill Bin Laden' Movie?

Just as the Oscar-winning director and her screenwriting collaborator Mark Boal have been meeting with actors for an Osama Bin Laden assassination project, Bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces in a Pakistani compound.

Kathryn Bigelow
Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Somebody get Kathryn Bigelow a rewrite! 

Just as the Oscar-winning director and her screenwriting collaborator Mark Boal have been meeting with actors for an Osama Bin Laden assassination project, Bin Laden was killed by U.S. forces in a Pakistani compound. 

How this will impact the project is yet to be seen. Bigelow and Boal, the director and writer of 2009 best picture winner The Hurt Locker, are working on an action thriller tentatively titled Kill Bin Laden. The movie is to be based on a failed Black Ops mission by the US military to capture the Al-Qaida leader. 

Michael Fassbender was one of the actors in contention to star, but he is no longer in the running. Joel Edgerton is the latest to be circling, and sources say he is likely to attach himself now that his association with Universal's Snow White and the Huntsman seems to have waned. (Edgerton was until about a week ago a strong contender to play the Huntsman, a role Viggo Mortensen was once interested in playing.) 

But now that Bin Laden has been killed, what happens to the Kill Bin Laden project?

The real-world development could impact the project in several possible ways: The movie could stay more or less the same, gaining momentum as Sunday’s events give its subject matter added weight, context and timeliness. Or perhaps the project will do a 180-degree turn, with a new story line and focus. We can't imagine the events surrounding Bin Laden's ultimate killing not being incorporated into the script in some fashion. 

Or, of course, Bigelow could lose interest in the subject matter altogether, especially given all the other Bin Laden projects that will likely be fast-tracked to capitalize on the intense worldwide interest in this subject. Paramount in 2006 optioned Jawbreaker, a book written by intelligence operative Gary Bernsten, about a 2001 hunt for Bin Laden during the opening stages of the war in Afghanistan. The next few weeks will likely see a ton of new Bin Laden projects, especially as the details of the U.S. mission to kill him become known.   

We hear Bigelow and Boal are digesting the news and will spend the week figuring out their next move. We can be sure that Boal will be using his extensive intelligence connections to get the inside dope on the mission. And if they move forward, the final film will no doubt be authentic and timely.