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JAN
6
3 YEARS

Actress Suing IMDB Reveals Her Real Name

Huong Junie Hoang Headshot - P 2012

The actress suing IMDb for revealing her real age has revealed her real name in a new court filing.

Huong Hoang is the actress who sued claiming the Internet search database had violated her right of privacy and opened her up to rampant age discrimination in Hollywood by telling everyone she's 40 years old. She says in an amended complaint filed today in Washington that she typically goes by her Americanized stage name, Junie Hoang, because her Asian name is difficult to pronounce and has led to discrimination in Hollywood.

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Texas-based Hoang, whose IMDb page reveals she has worked fairly regularly in recent years on such small-budget movies as Gingerbread Man 3: Saturday Night Cleaver and Hoodrats 2: Hoodrat Warriors, says she was forced to sue when IMDb took personal information gleaned from a credit card she used to sign up for the subcription service IMDb Pro and used it to reveal that she is 40. The suit claims she has been subjected to rampant discrimination in ageist Hollywood.

STORY: IMDb Explains Why 40-Year-Old Actress Shouldn't Fear Blacklisting

Huang's lawsuit generated tons of attention when it was filed a few months ago, partly because the plaintiff was anonymous and mostly because it brought up the thorny issue of ageism in Hollywood. The actor guilds SAG and AFTRA both backed the lawsuit, and one actor wrote an opinion piece for The Hollywood Reporter slamming the widely used IMDb for getting his age wrong.

STORY: An Actor Pens an Open Letter to IMDb; Says He's 4 1/2 Years Younger Than They Claim

Amazon, IMDb's parent, asked a federal judge to force the plaintiff to reveal herself, citing the judicial process' strong preference for transparency and its belief that proceeding openly would not subject Hoang to measurable discrimination in Hollywood. Hoang, repped by Washington lawyer John Dozier, opposed the effort to unmask her, but on Dec. 23 the judge ruled that Hoang must come forward with a new complaint under her own name or it would be dismissed.

She has now refiled the case. Read the full complaint here.  

Email: Matthew.Belloni@thr.com

Twitter: @THRMattBelloni