ABC is being sued for sex discrimination by a female rigging grip who worked on How to Get Away With Murder

Troi Wilson says she's one of few women in her line of work and was used to the boys club, but was subjected to name calling, harassment and discrimination. 

"Plaintiff hoped that working on a Shonda Rhimes production would be different," writes attorney Daniel Barth in the complaint. "It was not. Her workplace was a cesspool of misogyny, discrimination and hate."

Rhimes is not being sued. But Wilson claims she was marginalized while working on the series, fired in retaliation and blacklisted.

Wilson was hired as a key rigging grip on the ABC series in 2014 and says she was unlawfully terminated during the hiatus between seasons three and four. During her time working on the show, Wilson says she was called names like "bitch" and "c—" by the show's construction crew and was asked, "Who did you blow to get this job?"

She also says unit production manager Bryan Thomas "nitpicked" her work in a way he didn't do with her male colleagues and "spoke to her in a belittling and belligerent manner" — and claims the show's construction coordinator James Barron treated her with disdain when she tried to discuss safety issues. 

The grip says things escalated through season three and in January 2017, Barron screamed uncontrollably at her; when Wilson reported it to Thomas, he screamed at her, too. That May, Wilson was told she wouldn't be called back for the next season and says the person who replaced her was "a less qualified man."

Wilson says someone has been telling others in hiring positions that she's incompetent and unprofessional, and she's been rejected for jobs at CBS, Fox, Disney and ABC.

Wilson is suing ABC, Touchstone Television and Thomas. Her claims include sex discrimination, retaliation, wrongful termination and defamation. 

ABC and Rhimes have not yet responded to a request for comment.