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03-28-2022 Daily Edition March 27, 2022

Daily Edition

Oscars: Full List of Winners

CODA was named best picture at the 94th Academy Awards on Sunday night at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. With his best supporting actor win, the film’s Troy Kotsur became only the second deaf person ever to win an Oscar, following in the footsteps of his CODA co-star Marlee Matlin, who won in 1987 for […]

CODA was named best picture at the 94th Academy Awards on Sunday night at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood.

With his best supporting actor win, the film’s Troy Kotsur became only the second deaf person ever to win an Oscar, following in the footsteps of his CODA co-star Marlee Matlin, who won in 1987 for Children of a Lesser God.

CODA also won best adapted screenplay, with Siân Heder taking home the trophy.

Will Smith was named best leading actor for King Richard. The actor had previously taken the stage to slap presenter Chris Rock after the latter had made a joke about Smith’s wife, Jada Pinkett Smith. He used his speech to apologize.

Jessica Chastain was named best actress for The Eyes of Tammy Faye. Ariana DeBose won best supporting actress for West Side Story, becoming the first openly queer woman of color to win any category.

Belfast was named best original screenplay, scoring a win for Kenneth Branagh. Jane Campion went home with the best director Oscar for The Power of the Dog, becoming only the third woman ever to win the award, following in the footsteps of Kathryn Bigelow and Chloé Zhao.

Encanto was named best animated feature, while Japan’s Drive My Car won best international feature and Summer of Soul won best documentary feature.

Siblings Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell won the Oscar for best original song for “No Time to Die” from the James Bond movie of the same name.

Regina Hall, Amy Schumer and Wanda Sykes hosted, while Will Packer and Shayla Cowan produced the show.

Oscars were handed out in 23 categories, from best picture to best director, along with the acting categories and crafts categories including best sound, best production design, best makeup and hairstyling, and best visual effects. This year, a best popular film category was added to recognize a film chosen by fans, based on Twitter votes. That award went to Zack Snyder’s Army of the Dead.

In addition, the Academy moved forward with its controversial plan to present winners in eight categories — documentary short, film editing, makeup/hairstyling, original score, production design, animated short, live-action short and sound — ahead of the live telecast. Those Oscars were handed out inside the Dolby from 4-5 p.m. PT, with the presentations recorded and edited into the broadcast. Among those early categories, Dune went home with four awards: best sound, film editing, original score and production design. It also won best cinematography and best visual effects during the live broadcast.

Visit The Hollywood Reporter’s awards hub for all the news and analysis, along with Scott Feinberg’s The Race and Carolyn Giardina’s Behind the Screen blogs for more insight into this year’s Oscars.

A full list of winners follows.

BEST PICTURE
CODA (Philippe Rousselet, Fabrice Gianfermi and Patrick Wachsberger, Producers) (WINNER)
Belfast
(Laura Berwick, Kenneth Branagh, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas, Producers)
Don’t Look Up (Adam McKay and Kevin Messick, Producers)
Drive My Car (Teruhisa Yamamoto, Producer)
Dune (Mary Parent, Denis Villeneuve and Cale Boyter, Producers)
King Richard (Tim White, Trevor White and Will Smith, Producers)
Licorice Pizza (Sara Murphy, Adam Somner and Paul Thomas Anderson, Producers)
Nightmare Alley (Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale and Bradley Cooper, Producers)
The Power of the Dog (Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Roger Frappier, Producers)
West Side Story (Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, Producers)

BEST DIRECTOR
Jane Campion (The Power of the Dog) (WINNER)
Paul Thomas Anderson (Licorice Pizza)
Kenneth Branagh (Belfast)
Ryûsuke Hamaguchi (Drive My Car)
Steven Spielberg (West Side Story)

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain (The Eyes of Tammy Faye) (WINNER)
Olivia Colman (The Lost Daughter)
Penélope Cruz (Parallel Mothers)
Nicole Kidman (Being the Ricardos)
Kristen Stewart (Spencer)

BEST ACTOR
Will Smith (King Richard) (WINNER)
Javier Bardem (Being the Ricardos)
Benedict Cumberbatch (The Power of the Dog)
Andrew Garfield (Tick, Tick … Boom!)
Denzel Washington (The Tragedy of Macbeth)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Ariana DeBose (West Side Story) (WINNER)
Jessie Buckley (The Lost Daughter)
Judi Dench (Belfast)
Kirsten Dunst (The Power of the Dog)
Aunjanue Ellis (King Richard)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Troy Kotsur (CODA) (WINNER)
Ciarán Hinds (Belfast)
Jesse Plemons (The Power of the Dog)
J.K. Simmons (Being the Ricardos)
Kodi Smit-McPhee (The Power of the Dog)

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Cruella (Jenny Beavan) (WINNER)
Cyrano (Massimo Cantini Parrini and Jacqueline Durran)
Dune (Jacqueline West and Robert Morgan)
Nightmare Alley (Luis Sequeira)
West Side Story (Paul Tazewell)

BEST SOUND
Dune (Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett) (WINNER)
Belfast
(Denise Yarde, Simon Chase, James Mather and Niv Adiri)
No Time to Die (Simon Hayes, Oliver Tarney, James Harrison, Paul Massey and Mark Taylor)
The Power of the Dog (Richard Flynn, Robert Mackenzie and Tara Webb)
West Side Story (Tod A. Maitland, Gary Rydstrom, Brian Chumney, Andy Nelson and Shawn Murphy)

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Dune (Hans Zimmer) (WINNER)
Don’t Look Up
(Nicholas Britell)
Encanto (Germaine Franco)
Parallel Mothers (Alberto Iglesias)
The Power of the Dog (Jonny Greenwood)

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
CODA (screenplay by Siân Heder) (WINNER)
Drive My Car (screenplay by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe)
Dune (screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve and Eric Roth)
The Lost Daughter (written by Maggie Gyllenhaal)
The Power of the Dog (written by Jane Campion)

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Belfast (written by Kenneth Branagh) (WINNER)
Don’t Look Up (screenplay by Adam McKay; story by Adam McKay & David Sirota)
King Richard (written by Zach Baylin)
Licorice Pizza (written by Paul Thomas Anderson)
The Worst Person in the World (written by Eskil Vogt, Joachim Trier)

BEST ANIMATED SHORT
The Windshield Wiper (Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez) (WINNER)
Affairs of the Art (Joanna Quinn and Les Mills)
Bestia (Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz)
Boxballet (Anton Dyakov)
Robin Robin (Dan Ojari and Mikey Please)

BEST LIVE-ACTION SHORT
The Long Goodbye (Aneil Karia and Riz Ahmed) (WINNER)

Ala Kachuu — Take and Run (Maria Brendle and Nadine Lüchinger)
The Dress (Tadeusz Lysiak and Maciej Ślesicki)
On My Mind (Martin Strange-Hansen and Kim Magnusson)
Please Hold (K.D. Dávila and Levin Menekse)

BEST FILM EDITING
Dune (Joe Walker) (WINNER)
Don’t Look Up
(Hank Corwin)
King Richard (Pamela Martin)
The Power of the Dog (Peter Sciberras)
Tick, Tick … Boom! (Myron Kerstein and Andrew Weisblum)

BEST MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
The Eyes of Tammy Faye (Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram and Justin Raleigh) (WINNER)
Coming 2 America
(Mike Marino, Stacey Morris and Carla Farmer)
Cruella (Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne and Julia Vernon)
Dune (Donald Mowat, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr)
House of Gucci (Göran Lundström, Anna Carin Lock and Frederic Aspiras)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Encanto (Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino and Clark Spencer) (WINNER)
Flee (Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie)
Luca (Enrico Casarosa and Andrea Warren)
The Mitchells vs. the Machines (Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller and Kurt Albrecht)
Raya and the Last Dragon (Don Hall, Carlos López Estrada, Osnat Shurer
and Peter Del Vecho)

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Summer of Soul (Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Joseph Patel, Robert Fyvolent and David Dinerstein) (WINNER)
Ascension
(Jessica Kingdon, Kira Simon-Kennedy and Nathan Truesdell)
Attica (Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry)
Flee (Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sorensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie)
Writing With Fire (Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh)

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT
The Queen of Basketball (Ben Proudfoot) (WINNER)
Audible
(Matt Ogens and Geoff McLean)
Lead Me Home (Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk)
Three Songs for Benazir (Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei)
When We Were Bullies (Jay Rosenblatt)

BEST ORIGINAL SONG
“No Time to Die” — music and lyrics by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell (No Time to Die) (WINNER)
“Be Alive” — music and lyrics by DIXSON and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter (King Richard)
“Dos Oruguitas” — music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda (Encanto)
“Down to Joy” — music and lyrics by Van Morrison (Belfast)
“Somehow You Do” — music and lyrics by Diane Warren (Four Good Days)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Dune (Greig Fraser) (WINNER)
Nightmare Alley (Dan Laustsen)
The Power of the Dog (Ari Wegner)
The Tragedy of Macbeth (Bruno Delbonnel)
West Side Story (Janusz Kaminski)

BEST INTERNATIONAL FEATURE
Drive My Car (Japan) (WINNER)
Flee (Denmark)
The Hand of God (Italy)
Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom (Bhutan)
The Worst Person in the World (Norway)

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN
Dune (production design: Patrice Vermette; set decoration: Zsuzsanna Sipos) (WINNER)
Nightmare Alley (production design: Tamara Deverell; set decoration: Shane Vieau)
The Power of the Dog (production design: Grant Major; set decoration: Amber Richards)
The Tragedy of Macbeth (production design: Stefan Dechant; set decoration: Nancy Haigh)
West Side Story (production design: Adam Stockhausen; set decoration: Rena DeAngelo)

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Dune (Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Brian Connor and Gerd Nefzer) (WINNER)
Free Guy (Swen Gillberg, Bryan Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis and Dan Sudick)
No Time to Die (Charlie Noble, Joel Green, Jonathan Fawkner and Chris Corbould)
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (Christopher Townsend, Joe Farrell, Sean Noel Walker and Dan Oliver)
Spider-Man: No Way Home (Kelly Port, Chris Waegner, Scott Edelstein and Dan Sudick)

Will Smith Tearfully Apologizes to Academy After Chris Rock Oscars Slap

Will Smith took the stage for a second time at the 2022 Oscars, but this appearance was under calmer circumstances, after winning best actor for King Richard. The star nabbed his first Academy Award for his role as Richard Williams, father to tennis greats Venus and Serena Williams, in director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s biopic. Smith was […]

Will Smith took the stage for a second time at the 2022 Oscars, but this appearance was under calmer circumstances, after winning best actor for King Richard.

The star nabbed his first Academy Award for his role as Richard Williams, father to tennis greats Venus and Serena Williams, in director Reinaldo Marcus Green’s biopic. Smith was previously nominated for best actor twice, for 2001’s Ali and 2006’s The Pursuit of Happyness.

Smith shocked Oscars viewers earlier Sunday evening when, in a stunning moment of live television, he slapped presenter Chris Rock onstage after the comedian joked about the actor’s wife, Jada Pinkett Smith, sporting a shaved head.

As his name was called as the winner, Smith took a beat from his chair to lean his forehead against Jada’s, and they shared a kiss.

“Richard Williams was a fierce defender of his family,” Smith said from the stage through tears. “In this time in my life, in this moment, I am overwhelmed by what God is calling on me to do and be in this world. Making this film, I got to protect Aunjanue Ellis, who is one of the strongest, most delicate people I’ve ever met. I got to protect Saniyya [Sidney] and Demi [Singleton], the two actresses that played Venus and Serena. I’m being called on in my life to love people and to protect people and to be a river to my people.”

Smith continued, “To do what we do, you got to be able to take abuse. You gotta be able to have people talk crazy about you. In this business, you gotta be able to have people disrespecting you, and you gotta smile, and you gotta pretend like that’s OK.”

He said that, after the Rock onstage moment, Denzel Washington told him off-camera, “At your highest moment, be careful — that’s when the devil comes for you.”

Smith then told the crowd, “I want to be a vessel for love.” At that moment, ABC aired an Oscars logo in place of the live feed of Smith’s speech. “I just spit — I hope they didn’t see that on TV,” he quipped as the camera cut to the real-life Williams family before returning to Smith.

“I want to apologize to the Academy; I want to apologize to all my fellow nominees,” Smith shared. “This is a beautiful moment, and I’m not crying for winning an award. It’s not about winning an award for me. It’s about being able to shine light on all of the people.”

Smith, who did not mention Rock directly, continued, “Art imitates life — I look like the crazy father, just like they said about Richard Williams.” The camera then showed Serena Williams laughing. “But love will make you do crazy things,” he continued.

“I hope the Academy invites me back,” Smith added with a laugh as he ended his speech.

After his win, Smith skipped the press room (where media outlets were instructed to ask winners only about their specific win and work.)

Following the ceremony, the Academy addressed the altercation in a statement shared to social media. “The Academy does not condone violence of any form,” the message read. It added that the winners “deserve this moment of recognition from their peers and movie lovers around the world.”

Roger Ross Williams, a Black member of the Academy’s board of governors, told The Hollywood Reporter after the show that the incident upset him.

“I was in tears,” he said. “It reinforces stereotypes about Black people and it just hurts me. … Work it out someplace else, not on a stage.”

Will Packer, who produced this year’s ceremony, also commented on the furor by tweeting after the show, “Welp…I said it wouldn’t be boring #Oscars.”

The LAPD confirmed that Rock opted not to file a police report about the incident, saying in a statement, “If the involved party desires a police report at a later date, LAPD will be available to complete an investigative report.”

Earlier, while presenting the Oscar for best documentary, Rock said, “Jada, I love you. G.I. Jane 2, can’t wait to see it.” Jada, who has worn short hair at various times throughout her career, opened up in 2018 about her battle with alopecia. In December 2021, she posted a video to Instagram showing a new patch of hair loss and said she would have to take her hair “down to the scalp so nobody thinks [I] got brain surgery or something.”

This is not the first Oscars ceremony during which Rock has mentioned Pinkett Smith, his co-star in the Madagascar film franchise. While hosting in 2016, Rock referenced Pinkett Smith having said that she would not attend the Oscars ceremony that year or even watch from home due to the lack of diverse representation among the nominees. “Jada says she’s not coming. Protesting. I’m like, ‘Ain’t she on a TV show?'” Rock said in his 2016 monologue. “Jada boycotting the Oscars is like me boycotting Rihanna’s panties. I wasn’t invited! … But I understand! I’m not hating. I understand you’re mad. Jada’s mad her man, Will, was not nominated for Concussion. I get it.”

When asked shortly after the 2016 ceremony about Rock’s comments, Pinkett Smith said, “It comes with the territory. We gotta keep it moving.”

Will Smith was considered the frontrunner in the best actor category, having won numerous key bellwether prizes for the role, including the SAG, Critics Choice, BAFTA and Golden Globe awards.

Also nominated for the best actor Oscar were Javier Bardem (Being the Ricardos), Benedict Cumberbatch (The Power of the Dog), Andrew Garfield (Tick, Tick … Boom!) and Denzel Washington (The Tragedy of Macbeth).

King Richard, nominated for six Oscars including best picture, tells the fact-based story of the titular patriarch (Smith) helping daughters Venus (Sidney) and Serena (Singleton) to succeed in a sport largely dominated by white athletes. Ellis was nominated for best supporting actress for her role as Richard’s then-wife and the girls’ mother, Oracene “Brandy” Price.

The 94th annual Academy Awards show took place at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood and was hosted by Regina Hall, Amy Schumer and Wanda Sykes.

‘Lost City’ Unearths Female-Fueled $31M Opening in Big Win for Box Office Recovery

Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum’s The Lost City opened to a better-than-expected $31 million domestically from 4,252 theaters in a significant win for the box office recovery. Until now, males under the age of 35 have fueled the rebound, while titles depending upon older adults — particularly older females — have lagged. Paramount’s Lost City, […]

Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum’s The Lost City opened to a better-than-expected $31 million domestically from 4,252 theaters in a significant win for the box office recovery.

Until now, males under the age of 35 have fueled the rebound, while titles depending upon older adults — particularly older females — have lagged.

Paramount’s Lost City, an action-packed romance adventure that’s a throwback to the era of Romancing the Stone, bucked that trend in a major way. Roughly 60 percent of Friday ticket buyers were female, while a whopping 47 percent were over 35.

The gender demo changed somewhat as the weekend went on, but female ticket buyers still led with 56 percent. The age breakdown stayed the same, meaning that nearly half of all ticket buyers were 35 and older.

The movie over-indexed everywhere west of the Mississippi, was at norm in the southeast, and under-indexed in the northeast. Canada came in with a healthy 7.5 percent. Top markets that over-indexed included Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Denver, Tampa, Minneapolis, Portland, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Albuquerque, Honolulu and Oklahoma City. Top markets that under-indexed included New York, Chicago, Houston, Atlanta, Philadelphia and Boston.

The Lost City has breathed theatrical life into the adventure-comedy-romance genre which has been somewhat scarce of late,” Paramount domestic distribution president Chris Aronson said. “A sensational opening!”

Daniel Radcliffe of Harry Potter fame also stars in the movie, which made its world premiere at the SXSW festival earlier this month.

Overseas, the film earned $3.7 million from its first 16 smaller-size markets.

The Batman continued to fare nicely, earning $20.5 million to finish Sunday at $332 million domestically. It earned another $25 million overseas for a foreign tally of $340 million and $672.9 million worldwide, including a hefty $52.7 million from Imax theaters. One weak link is China, where numerous cinemas have closed amid a new surge in COVID-19 cases. Batman tumbled to $3.1 million in its second weekend for a China total of $17.9 million, according to Warners.

Indian action pic RRR made headlines in its North America debut where it came in third with $9.5 million from 1,160 locations, a record for an Indian film. Distributor Sarigama is treating the movie as an event offering and is charging more for tickets.

Climbing adventure Infinite Storm, starring Naomi Watts, didn’t fare so well. The Bleecker Street release opted to debut nationwide in 1,525 locations and opened to a dismal $751,296.

At the specialty box office, the acclaimed Everything Everywhere All at Once (A24), starring Michelle Yeoh, was a breakout hit with a weekend location average of $50,965 from 10 locations in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Mothering Sunday (Sony Pictures Classics), starring Odessa Young, opened in five cinemas. The film’s weekend per-location average was $1,800 or thereabouts.

Among holdovers back in the top 10, Sony and Marvel’s Spider-Man: No Way Home still had plenty to boast of more than three months after first opening in theaters. The superhero pic has become only the third film in history to cross the $800 million mark domestically, behind Avengers: Endgame ($858.4 million) and Star Wars: The Force Awakens ($936.7 million), not adjusted for inflation.

Spidey grossed $2 million for the weekend to finish Sunday with a domestic total of $800.5 million and $1.88 billion globally.

March 27, 7:40 a.m.: Updated with revised estimates.

Oscars: Winners Respond Backstage to “Short Sighted” Telecast Format Change

The Academy presented eight Oscars in the so-called “golden hour” before the 2022 live broadcast began, celebrating the artists and their work. But afterwards in the press room, numerous winners weighed in on the controversial decision to award them before the live broadcast and play edited versions during the telecast. Joe Walker, the Oscar-winning film […]

The Academy presented eight Oscars in the so-called “golden hour” before the 2022 live broadcast began, celebrating the artists and their work.

But afterwards in the press room, numerous winners weighed in on the controversial decision to award them before the live broadcast and play edited versions during the telecast.

Joe Walker, the Oscar-winning film editor of Dune, pointed out the irony that his speech was edited for the televised ceremony — the beginning and the end. He admitted that “we understand the pressure on the Academy,” but argued “We all stand together in the Academy with equal strength, and I feel strongly that that was a disservice.”

His fellow Oscar winner from Dune, cinematographer Greig Fraser, admitted that he understood the decision to change the format but called it “little short sighted.”

“Films are made by the sound recordists, by the visual effects supervisors, by the editors, by the production designers. It seems odd to have some random relegation,” he said. “We understand the economics [of the Oscar telecast]. But at the same time, it’s up to us, I think, to change the economics. We want to encourage kids who are watching these awards to go [for instance] ‘you know what, I’m not an actor. I’m not a director. I’m not a producer, but I want to be a makeup artist.'”

“Obviously, ideally everyone’s speech gets equal air time and there’s no feeling of a hierarchy,” said Riz Ahmed, who won an Oscar for the live action short The Long Goodbye. “For me what is important is that that doesn’t become the story. Ultimately, we’re here to celebrate [the films].”

Alberto Mielgro, director of Oscar-winning animated short The Windshield Wiper, admitted “At first we felt it was an indignation. But it felt frivolous to protest.” He added, “I think they handled it well. … [but] I hope this is the last year they do that.”

And Jenny Beavan, who collected an Academy Award for costume design for Cruella during the live show, admitted that prior to the show, she signed one of the petitions urging the Academy to change its “very disrespectful” format. “I think it felt cheating on the people,” she said. “I think it would be better if then found a better way of shortening [the show].”