Late-Night Lately: The Hosts Take on Gun Control, the NRA and Olympics

8:00 AM 2/24/2018

by THR Staff

THR's Late-Night Lately rounds up the best sketches and guests with a look at what's to come next week.

Courtesy of HBO; Comedy Central;NBC

The Hollywood Reporter's Late-Night Lately is a one-stop shop for all of the most memorable moments of late-night TV, coming to you each Saturday morning to ease you into your weekend.

So fill up your coffee, set your DVR for the week and sit back. Below are a few of the week's best, funniest and strangest late-night moments you can't afford to miss.

— Compiled by Jennifer Konerman

  • John Oliver Makes Impassioned Plea to Discuss Gun Control After Florida Shooting

    Screengrab/Courtesy of HBO

    On Sunday's return of Last Week Tonight, John Oliver immediately commented on last week's shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 teachers and students dead. 

    Kicking off the show's fifth season, Oliver argued that lawmakers need to address the issue immediately and stop putting it off. "These events are now so familiar that we basically automatically know how each side will play out," Oliver said of the tragedy at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. "'Thoughts and prayers,' 'Fuck your thoughts and prayers,' 'It's a mental-health problem,' 'Yeah, but it's also a gun problem,' and then someone says, 'Now is not the time to talk about gun control,' and everyone moves on until it inevitably happens again."

    Oliver cited the survivors — students — who have been speaking out about this. "When the 'Now is not the time' argument came out, the kids from that school said, 'You know what? Yes, it fucking is,' " he said.

  • Colbert, Noah, Corden, Klepper Applaud Students Demanding Action on Gun Control

    Screengrab/Comedy Central

    The Parkland, Fla. high school students advocating for gun control suffered a legislative defeat on Tuesday, when the Florida State House rejected a motion to consider a bill to ban assault rifles. But their efforts to establish stricter U.S. laws have won the praise of late-night hosts, several of whom dedicated segments of their shows to the students on Tuesday. 

    On The Late Show, Stephen Colbert said that the one group that gave him hope that "we can protect the children" in the wake of the tragedy was the children themselves. Citing inaction on gun control from legislators, Colbert said, "I think we need to change the voting age. Until we do something about guns, you can't vote if you're over 18." 

    Colbert added, "I hope these kids don't give up. Because this is their lives and their future. Someone else may be in power, but this country belongs to them. And there is reason for hope." Citing the "Me Too" movement and how it brought down men in power, Colbert added, "This is an election year. If you want to see change you have to go to the polls and tell the people who will not protect you that their time is up."

    Later in the show, Colbert sat down with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and asked why a reform hasn’t been put in place regarding gun control. “This is unfathomable how many deaths we’ve had to see over and over and over again and Congress has done nothing,” Gillibrand explained. “The silence is literally deafening and they don’t get anything done because the NRA has a chokehold on Congress."

    Over on The Daily Show, Trevor Noah described the reaction to the mass shooting in Parkland as "the same old story" of warring gun-control factions after the tragedy except for one thing: "Those meddling kids." After playing footage of Marjory Parkman students speaking on national TV, Noah said, "This also just goes to show how upside-down everything becomes when guns are involved. Right now, kids are acting like adults and adults are acting like children."

    Play-acting the roles of parents and children, Noah said, "Because you've got senators like, 'You're taking away my favorite toys! This is so unfair!' And the kids are like, 'You can't have them if you're not responsible enough to handle them.'"

    The Opposition's Jordan Klepper invited two student gun-control advocates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on his show.

    Senior Delaney Tarr argued against the idea that the students wanted to infringe on Americans' liberties with their call for stricter laws. "We're not taking away your liberty, actually, and that's something we've tried to make clear time and time again," Tarr said. "Our goal is of course to let our younger siblings, to let our cousins, to let all the younger people that we know in our lives to go to school without that school being shot up. Ultimately that is our goal, to make the world safer, to make our country safer, because this is an American issue."

    When Klepper asked, playing the devil's advocate, whether arming teachers might not be the answer instead of gun control, senior Carly Novell quipped, "That's going to school in a prison and having teachers be your prison guards."

    “When I came to America, three years ago, to take this job, I could have never imagined that as a late-night host, I’d be talking about mass shootings and talking about so many of them,” James Corden said as he opened The Late Late Show. “I may not be American, but I have experience of what happened in my country when a mass shooting happened and I also have children who are American and they go to school here. And, like any parent, I want my kids to be safe."

    Corden praised the Parkland students for speaking out and declaring their demands for a change to be implemented in gun control. “When I see these kids talking, it makes me feel hopeful. It isn’t foreign late-night hosts you need to listen to. … But you can listen to America’s children. And it fills me with optimism that maybe Americans will be able to come together and put aside their differences to make a sensible change for those kids, for our kids and for all Americans."

    The Parkland, Fla. high school students advocating for gun control in the wake of a shooting at their school that left 17 dead suffered a legislative defeat on Tuesday, when the Florida State House rejected a motion to consider a bill to ban assault rifles. But their efforts to establish stricter U.S. laws have won the praise of late-night hosts, several of whom dedicated segments of their shows to the students on Tuesday night.

    On The Late Show, Stephen Colbert said that the one group that gave him hope that "we can protect the children" in the wake of the tragedy was the children themselves. Citing inaction on gun control from legislators, Colbert said with a straight face, "I think we need to change the voting age. Until we do something about guns, you can't vote if you're over 18."

    Noting that students at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school had been present at the Florida State House on Tuesday, Colbert added, "I hope these kids don't give up. Because this is their lives and their future. Someone else may be in power, but this country belongs to them. And there is reason for hope." Citing the "Me Too" movement and how it brought down men in power, Colbert added, "This is an election year. If you want to see change you have to go to the polls and tell the people who will not protect you that their time is up."

    Later in the show, Colbert sat down with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and asked why a reform hasn’t been put in place regarding gun control.

    “This is unfathomable how many deaths we’ve had to see over and over and over again and Congress has done nothing,” Gillibrand began explaining. “The silence is literally deafening and they don’t get anything done because the NRA has a chokehold on Congress. The NRA is concerned only with gun sales. It’s all about money. It’s all about greed. It has nothing to do with the second amendment. And we’ve seen death after death after death and it has to stop.”

    Colbert then pressed what exactly was the “chokehold” NRA has held on Congress, with Gillibrand explaining that they have a power of instilling fear. “They have so much power that nothing was done after Aurora. Nothing was done after Sandy Hook… And nothing is done now. It’s the power of money. It’s the power of communications. It’s the fear they instill in members and it’s wrong. It’s morally wrong.”

    Gillibrand also praised students who have spoken out after the shooting, demanding a change be implemented from Congress. “They’re now starting a movement and taking this into their own hands and speaking truth to power… The solution to this problem, Stephen, is listening to those kids and hearing their pain, frustration and their anger and doing something about it.”

    The senator then mentioned that she banned Corporate Pac checks, with several of her colleagues already following suit. “We have to start taking the money out of politics, because it undermines our democracy. Money is not speech,” Gillibrand said. The senator then referred to the NRA as “one of the worst offenders” to Congress.

    Over on The Daily Show, Trevor Noah described the reaction to the mass shooting in Parkland as "the same old story" of warring gun-control factions after the tragedy except for one thing: "Those meddling kids."

    After playing footage of Marjory Parkman students speaking on national TV, Noah said, "This also just goes to show how upside-down everything becomes when guns are involved. Right now, kids are acting like adults and adults are acting like children."

    Play-acting the roles of parents and children, Noah said, "Because you've got senators like, 'You're taking away my favorite toys! This is so unfair!' And the kids are like, 'You can't have them if you're not responsible enough to handle them.'"

    A half-hour later, on The Opposition, Jordan Klepper invited two student gun-control advocates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on his show.

    Senior Delaney Tarr argued against the idea that the students wanted to infringe on Americans' liberties with their call for stricter laws. "We're not taking away your liberty, actually, and that's something we've tried to make clear time and time again," Tarr said. "Our goal is of course to let our younger siblings, to let our cousins, to let all the younger people that we know in our lives to go to school without that school being shot up. Ultimately that is our goal, to make the world safer, to make our country safer, because this is an American issue."

    When Klepper asked, playing the devil's advocate, whether arming teachers might not be the answer instead of gun control, senior Carly Novell quipped, "That's going to school in a prison and having teachers be your prison guards."

    “When I came to America, three years ago, to take this job, I could have never imagined that as a late-night host, I’d be talking about mass shootings and talking about so many of them,” James Corden said as he opened The Late Late Show. “I may not be American, but I have experience of what happened in my country when a mass shooting happened and I also have children who are American and they go to school here. And, like any parent, I want my kids to be safe."

    The late-night host proceeded to reference a graph that assessed the ratio of mass shootings in a country to the amount of guns available for access. The United States surpassed every other country, with countries such as Japan and Australia having already passed strict gun laws to prevent mass shootings from occurring. Corden then took a moment to call for gun control that could follow suit with other countries.

    “We’ve done this too many times. I’ll be honest with you, after the mass shootings of the past few years in America, I’ve felt exactly the same as you. I’ve felt angry and confused and frustrated that nothing would be done to try to avoid these massacres… something has changed after the shooting in Parkland. This time, children seem to be using their voices louder.”

    Corden praised the Parkland students for speaking out and declaring their demands for a change to be implemented in gun control. “When I see these kids talking, it makes me feel hopeful. It isn’t foreign late-night hosts you need to listen to… But you can listen to America’s children. And it fills me with optimism that maybe Americans will be able to come together and put aside their differences to make a sensible change for those kids, for our kids and for all Americans. 

    The Parkland, Fla. high school students advocating for gun control in the wake of a shooting at their school that left 17 dead suffered a legislative defeat on Tuesday, when the Florida State House rejected a motion to consider a bill to ban assault rifles. But their efforts to establish stricter U.S. laws have won the praise of late-night hosts, several of whom dedicated segments of their shows to the students on Tuesday night.

    On The Late Show, Stephen Colbert said that the one group that gave him hope that "we can protect the children" in the wake of the tragedy was the children themselves. Citing inaction on gun control from legislators, Colbert said with a straight face, "I think we need to change the voting age. Until we do something about guns, you can't vote if you're over 18."

    Noting that students at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school had been present at the Florida State House on Tuesday, Colbert added, "I hope these kids don't give up. Because this is their lives and their future. Someone else may be in power, but this country belongs to them. And there is reason for hope." Citing the "Me Too" movement and how it brought down men in power, Colbert added, "This is an election year. If you want to see change you have to go to the polls and tell the people who will not protect you that their time is up."

    Later in the show, Colbert sat down with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and asked why a reform hasn’t been put in place regarding gun control.

    “This is unfathomable how many deaths we’ve had to see over and over and over again and Congress has done nothing,” Gillibrand began explaining. “The silence is literally deafening and they don’t get anything done because the NRA has a chokehold on Congress. The NRA is concerned only with gun sales. It’s all about money. It’s all about greed. It has nothing to do with the second amendment. And we’ve seen death after death after death and it has to stop.”

    Colbert then pressed what exactly was the “chokehold” NRA has held on Congress, with Gillibrand explaining that they have a power of instilling fear. “They have so much power that nothing was done after Aurora. Nothing was done after Sandy Hook… And nothing is done now. It’s the power of money. It’s the power of communications. It’s the fear they instill in members and it’s wrong. It’s morally wrong.”Gillibrand also praised students who have spoken out after the shooting, demanding a change be implemented from Congress. “They’re now starting a movement and taking this into their own hands and speaking truth to power… The solution to this problem, Stephen, is listening to those kids and hearing their pain, frustration and their anger and doing something about it.”

    The senator then mentioned that she banned Corporate Pac checks, with several of her colleagues already following suit. “We have to start taking the money out of politics, because it undermines our democracy. Money is not speech,” Gillibrand said. The senator then referred to the NRA as “one of the worst offenders” to Congress.

    Over on The Daily Show, Trevor Noah described the reaction to the mass shooting in Parkland as "the same old story" of warring gun-control factions after the tragedy except for one thing: "Those meddling kids."

    After playing footage of Marjory Parkman students speaking on national TV, Noah said, "This also just goes to show how upside-down everything becomes when guns are involved. Right now, kids are acting like adults and adults are acting like children."

    Play-acting the roles of parents and children, Noah said, "Because you've got senators like, 'You're taking away my favorite toys! This is so unfair!' And the kids are like, 'You can't have them if you're not responsible enough to handle them.'"

    A half-hour later, on The Opposition, Jordan Klepper invited two student gun-control advocates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on his show.

    Senior Delaney Tarr argued against the idea that the students wanted to infringe on Americans' liberties with their call for stricter laws. "We're not taking away your liberty, actually, and that's something we've tried to make clear time and time again," Tarr said. "Our goal is of course to let our younger siblings, to let our cousins, to let all the younger people that we know in our lives to go to school without that school being shot up. Ultimately that is our goal, to make the world safer, to make our country safer, because this is an American issue."

    When Klepper asked, playing the devil's advocate, whether arming teachers might not be the answer instead of gun control, senior Carly Novell quipped, "That's going to school in a prison and having teachers be your prison guards."

    “When I came to America, three years ago, to take this job, I could have never imagined that as a late-night host, I’d be talking about mass shootings and talking about so many of them,” James Corden said as he opened The Late Late Show. “I may not be American, but I have experience of what happened in my country when a mass shooting happened and I also have children who are American and they go to school here. And, like any parent, I want my kids to be safe."

    The late-night host proceeded to reference a graph that assessed the ratio of mass shootings in a country to the amount of guns available for access. The United States surpassed every other country, with countries such as Japan and Australia having already passed strict gun laws to prevent mass shootings from occurring. Corden then took a moment to call for gun control that could follow suit with other countries.

    “We’ve done this too many times. I’ll be honest with you, after the mass shootings of the past few years in America, I’ve felt exactly the same as you. I’ve felt angry and confused and frustrated that nothing would be done to try to avoid these massacres… something has changed after the shooting in Parkland. This time, children seem to be using their voices louder.”

    Corden praised the Parkland students for speaking out and declaring their demands for a change to be implemented in gun control. “When I see these kids talking, it makes me feel hopeful. It isn’t foreign late-night hosts you need to listen to… But you can listen to America’s children. And it fills me with optimism that maybe Americans will be able to come together and put aside their differences to make a sensible change for those kids, for our kids and for all Americans. 

    The Parkland, Fla. high school students advocating for gun control in the wake of a shooting at their school that left 17 dead suffered a legislative defeat on Tuesday, when the Florida State House rejected a motion to consider a bill to ban assault rifles. But their efforts to establish stricter U.S. laws have won the praise of late-night hosts, several of whom dedicated segments of their shows to the students on Tuesday night.

    On The Late Show, Stephen Colbert said that the one group that gave him hope that "we can protect the children" in the wake of the tragedy was the children themselves. Citing inaction on gun control from legislators, Colbert said with a straight face, "I think we need to change the voting age. Until we do something about guns, you can't vote if you're over 18."

    Noting that students at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas school had been present at the Florida State House on Tuesday, Colbert added, "I hope these kids don't give up. Because this is their lives and their future. Someone else may be in power, but this country belongs to them. And there is reason for hope." Citing the "Me Too" movement and how it brought down men in power, Colbert added, "This is an election year. If you want to see change you have to go to the polls and tell the people who will not protect you that their time is up."

    Later in the show, Colbert sat down with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and asked why a reform hasn’t been put in place regarding gun control.

    “This is unfathomable how many deaths we’ve had to see over and over and over again and Congress has done nothing,” Gillibrand began explaining. “The silence is literally deafening and they don’t get anything done because the NRA has a chokehold on Congress. The NRA is concerned only with gun sales. It’s all about money. It’s all about greed. It has nothing to do with the second amendment. And we’ve seen death after death after death and it has to stop.”

    Colbert then pressed what exactly was the “chokehold” NRA has held on Congress, with Gillibrand explaining that they have a power of instilling fear. “They have so much power that nothing was done after Aurora. Nothing was done after Sandy Hook… And nothing is done now. It’s the power of money. It’s the power of communications. It’s the fear they instill in members and it’s wrong. It’s morally wrong.”

    Gillibrand also praised students who have spoken out after the shooting, demanding a change be implemented from Congress. “They’re now starting a movement and taking this into their own hands and speaking truth to power… The solution to this problem, Stephen, is listening to those kids and hearing their pain, frustration and their anger and doing something about it.”

    The senator then mentioned that she banned Corporate Pac checks, with several of her colleagues already following suit. “We have to start taking the money out of politics, because it undermines our democracy. Money is not speech,” Gillibrand said. The senator then referred to the NRA as “one of the worst offenders” to Congress.

    Over on The Daily Show, Trevor Noah described the reaction to the mass shooting in Parkland as "the same old story" of warring gun-control factions after the tragedy except for one thing: "Those meddling kids."

    After playing footage of Marjory Parkman students speaking on national TV, Noah said, "This also just goes to show how upside-down everything becomes when guns are involved. Right now, kids are acting like adults and adults are acting like children."

    Play-acting the roles of parents and children, Noah said, "Because you've got senators like, 'You're taking away my favorite toys! This is so unfair!' And the kids are like, 'You can't have them if you're not responsible enough to handle them.'"

    A half-hour later, on The Opposition, Jordan Klepper invited two student gun-control advocates from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on his show.

    Senior Delaney Tarr argued against the idea that the students wanted to infringe on Americans' liberties with their call for stricter laws. "We're not taking away your liberty, actually, and that's something we've tried to make clear time and time again," Tarr said. "Our goal is of course to let our younger siblings, to let our cousins, to let all the younger people that we know in our lives to go to school without that school being shot up. Ultimately that is our goal, to make the world safer, to make our country safer, because this is an American issue."

    When Klepper asked, playing the devil's advocate, whether arming teachers might not be the answer instead of gun control, senior Carly Novell quipped, "That's going to school in a prison and having teachers be your prison guards."

    “When I came to America, three years ago, to take this job, I could have never imagined that as a late-night host, I’d be talking about mass shootings and talking about so many of them,” James Corden said as he opened The Late Late Show. “I may not be American, but I have experience of what happened in my country when a mass shooting happened and I also have children who are American and they go to school here. And, like any parent, I want my kids to be safe."

    The late-night host proceeded to reference a graph that assessed the ratio of mass shootings in a country to the amount of guns available for access. The United States surpassed every other country, with countries such as Japan and Australia having already passed strict gun laws to prevent mass shootings from occurring. Corden then took a moment to call for gun control that could follow suit with other countries.

    “We’ve done this too many times. I’ll be honest with you, after the mass shootings of the past few years in America, I’ve felt exactly the same as you. I’ve felt angry and confused and frustrated that nothing would be done to try to avoid these massacres… something has changed after the shooting in Parkland. This time, children seem to be using their voices louder.”

    Corden praised the Parkland students for speaking out and declaring their demands for a change to be implemented in gun control. “When I see these kids talking, it makes me feel hopeful. It isn’t foreign late-night hosts you need to listen to… But you can listen to America’s children. And it fills me with optimism that maybe Americans will be able to come together and put aside their differences to make a sensible change for those kids, for our kids and for all Americans. 

  • 'Tonight Show' Brings "Fallon 5" to Olympics Coverage

    Screengrab/YouTube

    Due to preemption by the Winter Olympics, Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon introduced the “Fallon Five,” a five-minute version of his nightly NBC program instead. On Monday, Fallon welcomed Paul Rudd and rushed through a truncated version of his monologue.

    Fallon held a one-minute interview with Rudd, cutting off answers as they went. Rudd talked about his favorite winter sport, got out a two-word description of his new Netflix film, Mute, showed off a very, very brief clip from it and even sang a duet with Fallon.

    Jimmy Fallon celebrated gold medalist Chloe Kim's newfound fame by photobombing unsuspecting people on Wednesday.

    Kim, who is just 17 years old, won the halfpipe snowboarding gold medal in the Pyeongchang Games on Feb. 13. At the beginning of the quick show, Fallon, pointing out that Kim had become so famous in the lead-up to the Olympics and during the ceremony that she had landed on the cover of Sports Illustrated, said he would like to have "some fun with your new fame." He said he had set up a photo session for some unsuspecting Olympic fans, and that he and Kim would photobomb the sessions.

    In a video montage that followed, Kim and Fallon posed in the background of the photographs in silly poses, including eating a sandwich, Fallon giving Kim a piggyback ride and Fallon wearing a Kim lookalike wig, hat and gold medal.

    On Thursday, Stranger Things' Caleb McLaughlin stepped into Fallon's "homemade" Tonight Show set made out of cardboard to talk about his NBA dreams and the future of the Netflix hit. 

  • Oprah Talks Presidency, Trump's Tweet on 'Kimmel'

    ABC/Randy Holmes

    During an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Oprah Winfrey responded to the tweet by President Trump about her appearance on 60 Minutes

    His tweet read, “Just watched a very insecure Oprah Winfrey, who at one point I knew very well, interview a panel of people on 60 Minutes. The questions were biased and slanted, the facts incorrect. Hope Oprah runs so she can be exposed and defeated just like all of the others!" 

    When asked if she thought of responding to the president on Twitter, she said resolutely, "Not a second."

    "You don't win by meeting to any kind of negativity head-on," she said.

    Kimmel responded: "We've already lost though, in general." 

  • Colbert Presents Donald Trump Jr.'s Bollywood Debut, "The Dance Of The Greasy Son"

    Courtesy of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert

    Stephen Colbert mocked Donald Trump Jr.'s visit to India this week, where he was meant to promote an apartment project while also meeting with political leaders. His comments about "smile on the faces" of the poor in India sparked criticism, and Colbert responded with his own faux Bollywood movie. 

    During the imagined musical scene, an edited excerpt of a film starring Aishwarya Rai, the lyrics include: "Why don't more poor people smile? You live in a penthouse in the sky paid for by your daddy, with a private hair gel caddy. ... So why do some poor Indians smile even though they don't have a cent? It's because they're happy to know their president is not your dad." 

  • Late-Night Lineup: February 25-March 3

    Monday, February 26
    Conan: Comedians and Spirit Awards hosts Nick Kroll and John Mulaney preview the indie awards show taking place March 3. 

    Wednesday, February 28
    The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: Black Panther star Chadwick Boseman has a lot to celebrate on the heels of his Marvel hit. Will he take on Fallon in his infamous NBC games? 

    The Late Show With Stephen Colbert: The very busy Donald Glover sits down with the CBS host to talk new music and the upcoming Lion King

    Thursday, March 1
    Watch What Happens Live: The always candid Real Housewives superfan Jennifer Lawrence enters the clubhouse. 

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