David Milch Makes Rare Public Appearance to Accept Lifetime Achievement at TCA Awards

The showrunner's 'Deadwood' was also recognized with the TV critics group's Heritage Award during the Saturday night ceremony in Beverly Hills.
Karen Tran
David Milch
Making a rare public appearance on Saturday night, David Milch was the lifetime achievement honoree at the Television Critics Association's 35th annual Awards in Beverly Hills. 
 
The famed TV writer, who created HBO’s Deadwood and wrote for the dramas NYPD Blue and Hill Street Blues, recently went public with his own Alzheimer’s diagnosis. 
 
“Heartfelt thanks for walking with me on my journey,” said Milch, who kept his remarks brief and focused on Deadwood in his speech between standing ovations. “Here’s hoping I have a few more stories left to tell.”

 
"The dirty secret is how deeply we care what the critics think,” Milch cracked in his thanks. 
 
Milch was revealed to be suffering from Alzheimer’s disease in April — a diagnosis he received about a year prior after some time noticing his own imperfect recall and a short temper. Milch’s reveal coincided with press for the Deadwood movie, a wrap-up of sorts to the three-season drama that was canceled in 2006. 
 
The Deadwood continuation, nominated for outstanding TV movie at the upcoming Emmys, has been regarded as the coda on Milch’s impressive career, as he has admitted even completing the teleplay and production was challenging. 
 
Deadwood also received the TCA’s Heritage Award during Saturday’s festivities.