Jane Fonda Says U.S. Needs Wall Between White House and Mueller Investigation

"We have every single right to know what is in that investigation," the 'Grace and Frankie' actress and activist said in an appearance on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!'
ABC/Randy Holmes
Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin promoting 'Grace and Frankie' on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live!'

Just after William Barr's attorney general confirmation hearing wrapped on Wednesday, Jane Fonda said in a fiery speech that the United States "needs a good wall" to separate the White House from the Mueller investigation.

"We need a good wall that keeps the White House away from the Mueller investigation. And we have every single right to know what the result of that investigation is and if there's some law that gives someone the right to edit the results, we have to change the law," the longtime actress and activist said at the end of an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live! with Grace and Frankie co-star Lily Tomlin on Wednesday.

Over the past two days, Barr has testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that he did not seek to interfere in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. The predecessor in the post, former attorney general Jeff Sessions, was publicly criticized by President Trump for recusing himself from the investigation.

"Can you imagine that they're trying to keep us from knowing who the person is that's running this country?" Fonda added.

Kimmel then sarcastically said that Trump wants the truth out there so there isn't "a single black mark" on that report or his presidency.

"We have to fulfill his wishes," she agreed, "Strikes and boycotts and marches and writing your congressman ... we can never again elect a leader who pits us against each other. When this is over, we have to come together! All of us, I don't care what party you belong to."

The Grace and Frankie star has a colorful history with activism, having fundraised for the Black Panther Party in the '70s, visited author and activist Angela Davis in prison, protested the Dakota Access Pipeline and infamously posed on an anti-aircraft gun during a trip to North Vietnam in 1972 where she urged American soldiers to reconsider their role in the country. (Fonda has since apologized for the photograph, which made it look like she was supporting the destruction of American war planes.)

More recently, in July she visited Capitol Hill to advocate for working women in the farming and domestic care industries to earn livable wages and have protection from sexual harassment.

The fifth season of Grace and Frankie — which was just renewed for a sixth season to make it the streamer's longest-running live-action scripted comedy — returns on Netflix Jan. 18.