Jimmy Kimmel's Office Gets a Makeover from Tidying Guru Marie Kondo

During the clean-up exercise, Kimmel discovered that some items needed better placement in his office — a wiffle bat signed by Magic Johnson, a sculpture of Kimmel's grandfather's head and an emergency ladder, to name a few.
ABC/Randy Holmes

Jimmy Kimmel hopped on board the KonMari train on Tuesday night when he invited tidying guru Marie Kondo to help him clean his office.

Kondo, the star of Netflix's Tidying Up with Marie Kondo and the author of four books on organization, including The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, was greeted by the late-night host announcing, "Can I be very honest with you? I had a nightmare about this; I woke up upset because I dreamed you came into my office and started destroying my things."

Kondo laughed and replied, "What's important about my method is that you'll be doing all the hard work. With the KonMari method, what we'll be doing here today is checking if everything that you own sparks joy or not."

First, Kondo and her translator sent "love and appreciation" to the office, signaling the start to her tidying method. 

Asked what he would prefer his office to look like, Kimmel said, "I'd like it to not be a rumpus room." Kondo then proceeded to assess Kimmel's work wardrobe and office items, encouraging him to consider their continued use.

Kondo's translator told Kimmel that the rumor that Kondo said people should have just "30 books" isn't true. "I don't know where that rumor came from, it's a complete misconception," the translator said. Kondo then proceeded to "wake up" mountains of books on Kimmel's floor by tapping them.

"Hey guys, wake up!" Kimmel addressed his books.

During the exercise, Kimmel found many surprising items, such as a yellow pages phone book, a wiffle bat signed by Magic Johnson (that particular item sparked so much joy that Kondo suggested it be placed on the wall), a pair of pants that Kimmel had lost, a sculpture of his grandfather's head and an emergency ladder "in case we need to escape," said the host.

After everything had been combed through and carefully decided upon, Kimmel's initial worries were long gone, and he said to Kondo and her translator, "I feel more stable emotionally now."