'She's Gotta Have It' Canceled at Netflix; Spike Lee to Shop Series

The comedy ran for two seasons at the streamer.
Netflix; Getty Images
'She's Gotta Have It' (Inset: Spike Lee)

She's Gotta Have It is ending on Netflix.

The streaming giant has canceled the contemporary update of Spike Lee's 1986 feature film after two seasons. Lee, who owns the IP, is expected to shop the scripted comedy to other outlets.

"Spike Lee is one of the greatest filmmakers of all time and we’re thrilled he brought the series She’s Gotta Have It to Netflix. While this is our last season, we're very proud that it will be on our service for years to come, and excited to be working with Spike on his upcoming Netflix film Da 5 Bloods," Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos said Wednesday in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter.

The news arrives less than two months after the sophomore season of the comedy starring breakout DeWanda Wise and Anthony Ramos returned on Netflix.

She's Gotta Have It marks the latest short-lived series to get the ax at Netflix. After the streamer canceled One Day at a Time following a three-season run, new information about its approach to new vs. returning series emerged. The company, which does not release specific viewership data, approaches renewals and cancellations with a viewing vs. cost approach — basically, if a new season of a returning series will continue to bring in new subscribers or if the streamer is better served allocating those financial resources to new projects instead. Season two of the show currently has a 67 percent rating among critics on RottenTomatoes.com.

She's Gotta Have It joins other short-lived series at Netflix including Santa Clarita Diet (canceled after three seasons), Friends From College, American Vandal and Between (two and done), among others.

Still, the company remains in business with Lee via his upcoming film Da 5 Bloods, its fourth collaboration with the writer, director and producer following She's Gotta Have It, Rodney King and See You Yesterday.

The streamer has come under fire of late for its penchant of cancelling scripted originals focused on underserved communities (including One Day at a Time). Netflix is currently embroiled in a salary dispute with the stars of On My Block, who are seeking sizable pay increases. Netflix head of originals Cindy Holland previously told THR that the company remains committed to stories focused on underrepresented communities with programming including Dear White People, Family Reunion, On My Block, Madam CJ Walker, its Emmy-nominated When They See Us and multiple films, among others.