'Watchmen' Podcast: How "This Extraordinary Being" Impacts the HBO Drama

The Hollywood Reporter's 'Series Regular' dives deep into week six of 'Watchmen,' with a closer look at Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' graphic novel for clues and callouts.
Mark Hill/HBO
'Watchmen'

Welcome back to Series RegularThe Hollywood Reporter's weekly podcast dedicated to diving deep into hit TV shows. 

Every episode of Series Regular comes courtesy of Josh Wigler (that's me!) and takes a closer look at the genre television space — and right now, it's all about one space in particular: Watchmen, the new HBO drama based on Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' seminal graphic novel of the same name. Wigler and co-host Antonio Mazzaro of Post Show Recaps fame will provide weekly podcast coverage of Watchmen, following each and every round of the nine-episode first season.

In "This Extraordinary Being," Watchmen answers one of the biggest questions lurking in the background since the start of the series — both in terms of the HBO drama, as well as the comic books from which the show take its cues. Hooded Justice is one of the first masked crime-fighters in the Watchmen universe, not to mention the only one whose identity remains concealed from the public. Now, at least Angela Abar (Regina King) and the audience both know the answer: Hooded Justice is Will Reeves, the wheelchair-bound man played in the present timeline by Louis Gossett Jr., and played in the vast majority of "This Extraordinary Being" by The Leftovers veteran Jovan Adepo.

"The way he expressed it was that he wanted to do something that was very reminiscent of the story of Superman," Adepo tells The Hollywood Reporter about signing onto the project and his initial conversations with series creator and showrunner Damon Lindelof. "And the first thing that he related to me, even before really getting into the history of the Watchmen and the Minutemen, was that he was telling the story of the young boy. You know Will's story as he's leaving Tulsa and as his father sends him out of the city and he writes on the back of the card: 'Watch over this boy.' And what he said for me to understand that was that this was supposed to kind of parallel Superman's father putting Kal-El into the space shuttle and sending him to Earth. That's the vision that he was basing it off of. Immediately, I was hooked. I'm a DC fan. I was like, 'Hell, yeah!'"

Listen to the Watchmen podcast below, and subscribe to make sure you don't miss an episode. Follow Wigler and Mazzaro on Twitter at @roundhoward and @acmazzaro, respectively, and send your questions and feedback to SeriesRegular@THR.com.

Series Regular is part of THR's roster of podcasts, including TV's Top 5, the weekly TV news analysis podcast hosted by West Coast TV editor Lesley Goldberg and chief TV critic Daniel Fienberg; Awards Chatter, Scott Feinberg's weekly in-depth (and award-winning) interview show focusing on the most interesting talents of the Oscar and Emmy seasons; crafts expert Carolyn Giardina's weekly series, Behind the Screen, which explores the top artists and technologies creating film and TV magic; and Seth Abramovitch's monthly series, It Happened in Hollywood, which revisits indelible moments from 90 years of THR's entertainment history. Other podcasts are in the works.